The volcanic peak which gave Kenya its name is second only to Kilimanjaro among Africa’s highest points. Not surprisingly it is predominantly hiking and climbing which draw people to the Mount Kenya National Park, with routes to match all abilities from keen first-timer to seasoned professional. Point Lenana is the most accessible of the mountain’s three peaks, but should only be attempted with guides.

From below, Mount Kenya is a stirring sight with its jagged outline sprinkled with snow and criss-crossed by glaciers. And this – remember – is just south of the Equator. The mountain’s steep slopes ensure dramatic changes in landscape within a small geographical area, rising from grass plains to alpine heights. The National Park, an UNESCO World Heritage Site, is also an important source of Kenya’s water, with rivers and other waterways attracting myriad bird species.

Practical Info:

Mount Kenya is 109 miles (175 kilometers) north-west of Nairobi, east of the Rift Valley. Accommodation facilities in the park are on the basic side.

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