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Sicán National Museum
Sicán National Museum

Sicán National Museum

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday
Av. Batán Grande Block 9, s/n. Carretera a Pítipo, Ferreñafe, Peru

The Basics

Also on display are artifacts that point to the existence of trade with faraway neighbors, such as blue stones from civilizations from as far away as Chile, and snails and shells that have been traced to the beaches of Ecuador.

Gain a deeper understanding of the ancient Sicán people by adding complementary attractions nearby, most notably Batán Grande, a sprawling area of Sicán pyramids in a verdant river valley. Most longer tours include the Royal Tombs Museum of Sipán, which displays the riches of the Lord of Sipan (the so-called “King Tut of Peru”) including dazzling gold and silver and jeweled headdresses and armored plates; and Valley of the Pyramids of Túcume, the 8th-century site encompassing dozens of Sicán mounds and pyramids.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Sicán National Museum is an ideal spot for history and archaeology buffs.
  • There is a small admission fee.
  • The museum is wheelchair-accessible.
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How to Get There

Sicán National Museum is located close to the city of Sipán, about a 20-minute drive from downtown Chiclayo.

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When to Get There

The museum is open year-round morning to evening, from Tuesday to Sunday. Come early to avoid the crowds. Chiclayo’s dry season runs from May to September, while the rainy season runs from December to March. Come to the area in June for a festival honoring San Pedro and San Pablo, the patron saints of fishermen and farmers; and in August when locals dance, throw fireworks, and hike to a highland village to mark Cruz de Chalpon.

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Wildcard

Batán Grande This sprawling remnant of the Sicán civilization is set amongst a grove of carob trees that form the largest dryland forest on South America’s west coast. Poking out from the field of green, eroded brown pyramids are all that remain of Sicán tombs that, for hundreds of years, were packed to the brim with gold. In fact, archaeologists estimate that over 90 percent of Peru’s gold was sourced from this river valley, and much of the gold in private collections is from looters who pillaged the forest.

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