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Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park
Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park

Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park

Hoi Ha Wan, Hong Kong

The Basics

Hoi Ha Wan means “bay beneath the sea,” and the marine park is one of the few areas in Hong Kong where hard coral still grows. Located in a sheltered bay, which offers better water clarity, the marine park covers an area of around 642 acres (260 hectares). Visitors come here to enjoy the beach, hike, snorkel, scuba dive, kayak, or canoe, and getting in the water is the best way to appreciate the park’s rich biodiversity of marine wildlife. Snorkel gear, kayaks, and canoes can be rented from shops in Hoi Ha village. There are also a number of hikes in the area, including to the remnants of a few lime kilns, reminders of what was once a thriving industry in the region.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Guided tours of Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park are available Sundays and public holidays; register at the Ha Wan Marine Park Warden Post in Hoi Ha Village.

  • Bring a hat, sunscreen, and water.

  • Visitors must obey the Marine Parks Visitor Code, which includes not taking any marine life out of the park.

  • Swimmers, snorkelers, and divers should not touch or stand on any coral.

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How to Get There

Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park is located in the New Territories. It’s easiest to take a taxi directly there. By public transportation, it’s an hours-long odyssey: take the MTR to Diamond Hill Station (exit C2), then bus 92 or 96R to Sai Kung town. From there, change to green minibus 7 to Hoi Ha Tsuen, and finally walk to the marine park.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park is open year-round, though being in the water is most pleasant during the high temperatures of summer. Rainy weather, especially strong downpours, can affect water clarity.

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Lime Kilns in Hoi Ha Wan

The lime kiln industry, which refined oyster shells and coral skeleton for agricultural and construction uses, stretches back thousands of years in Hong Kong. Find the remnants of four lime kilns, two of which are relatively intact, on the eastern shore of the marine park.

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