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Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark
Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark

Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark

Sai Kung, Hong Kong

The Basics

Part of the global UNESCO Geopark network, the Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark covers an area of about 191 square miles (500 square kilometers). Some areas can be accessed by car or by hiking in, but others can only be reached from the water, by boat or kayak. Several visitor’s centers and the Volcano Discovery Center provide information on the Geopark, including rock samples and ways to visit.

Many parts of the Geopark are remote; the easiest, and sometimes only, way to visit these areas is with a guided hiking or boat tour of popular sites like High Island and Sharp Island, or more remote sites like Port Island-Bluff Head and Nine Pin Group.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • There is no admission fee to enter the Geopark.

  • There is limited shade in some areas, so bring a hat, sunscreen, and plenty of water.

  • Wear comfortable, sturdy shoes, suitable for walking long distances over uneven surfaces, especially if you’re planning on hiking.

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How to Get There

To reach sites in the Sai Kung Volcanic Rock Region, head to Sai Kung town (via taxi or MTR and bus/minibus), then take a minibus, taxi, hike, or a ferry, depending on the area you want to reach. To get to the Northeast New Territories Sedimentary Rock Region, head to the Plover Cove Country Park area (via taxi or MTR and bus/minibus), and then hike, bike, or ferry from Ma Liu Shui Pier.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

The Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark can be visited year-round. Some sites can be reached via hiking, which is most pleasant between November and March. Some sites can only be accessed from the water, which may require calm seas.

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Geopark Highlights

Highlights of the Sai Kung Volcanic Rock Region include rare acidic hexagonal rock columns around High Island, tombolo (tidal spit) on Sharp Island, and sea caves and sea arches of the Ung Kong Group. In the Northeast New Territories Sedimentary Rock Region, find sedimentary rocks formed during different geologic periods, from the oldest in Tolo Channel to the youngest on Tung Ping Chau, as well as the vivid red sandstone on Port Island-Bluff Head.

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