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Things to do in Trinidad and Tobago

Things to do in  Trinidad and Tobago

Welcome to Trinidad and Tobago

The twin islands of Trinidad and Tobago, located off the coast of Venezuela, are a lesson in contradiction: large and small, industrial and pristine, developed and not. However, they're part of the same country, share the same spirit, and exist in harmony. On Trinidad, the oil and gas industry are a big part of local life, with sightseeing tours revealing mangrove swamps sitting beside smokestacks. In the capital, Port of Spain, highlights include the House of Parliament (Red House), the Magnificent Seven (a string of impressive colonial houses), Queen's Park Savannah, Maracas Bay, and the Royal Botanical Gardens. The southern end of Trinidad is home to Pitch Lake, which draws travelers with its title of world's largest natural asphalt deposit, while Chaguaramas Boardwalk is also worth a visit for walking, cycling, and swimming. Trinidad is a bastion of untouched Caribbean landscape, ringed with white-sand beaches and dotted with coconut palms. From Scarborough, island landmarks such as Pigeon Peak and Fort King George are easy to access on day trips, while both islands offer plentiful opportunities for birdwatching, with the Asa Wright Nature Centre and the Caroni Bird Sanctuary being top choices for naturalists. And of course, there is the water—sail, swim, dive, and snorkel. Buccoo Reef is a favorite for getting to know the islands' underwater life via glass-bottom boat or through your own snorkel mask.

Top 10 attractions in Trinidad and Tobago

#1
Buccoo Reef

Buccoo Reef

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The coral reefs of Tobago, so crucial to the island’s economy and the biodiversity of the region, are under threat. But sensitive tourism needn’t harm the environment as the island’s largest such site, Buccoo Reef, demonstrates. It is one of the most spectacular reefs in the world, now under protection as a marine park, and is a magnet for scuba diving, snorkeling and sustainable fishing.Tours in a glass-bottomed boat ensure that even the less active will be able to marvel at this undersea wonderland of colorful coral and tropical fish. The warm, shallow waters of the natural “Nylon Pool”, named by Princess Margaret for its translucent waters, make for one of the great swimming spots of the Caribbean.More
#2
Las Cuevas Beach

Las Cuevas Beach

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Meaning ‘The Caves Beach’ in Spanish, this long stretch of Blue Flag beach is so-called due to the small caves that line its shore. A beach lover’s paradise, Las Cuevas is blessed with soft white sand lapped by turquoise waters, and is framed by beautiful flowering trees.Las Cuevas Beach is just a short drive from Maracas and is usually far less crowded than its more commercialized neighbor. It has everything you might need for a lazy day on the beach though, with a car park, snack bar, shower and changing facilities, plus lifeguards on duty until 6pm. If lazing about in the sun doesn’t appeal, there are always the caves in which to seek shelter from the tropical heat, plus the beach is ideal for a long stroll or a relaxing swim.A day trip to Las Cuevas Beach from Port of Spain involves a scenic drive along the coast, revealing some stunning views of the Caribbean Sea. Your tour is likely to stop at the Maracas Lookout on the way and at Maracas again to sample its famous Bake and Fish sandwich on the return journey. A visit to Las Cuevas Beach is also included on the coastal tour of Trinidad itinerary.More
#3
Maracas Bay

Maracas Bay

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Maracas Bay lies at the end of a scenic mountain drive from Port of Spain. As you descend to the coast you get glimpses of a perfect natural bay fringed with dazzling white sands and swaying palms, all of which readily indicate why this is Trinidad's most popular beach.The hypnotic roll tumbling of blue-green waves make this a great place for paddling, but if you insist on more strenuous activity there is surfing, diving and walking trails in the surrounding rainforest.The area is known particularly as the home of 'Bake and Shark' (battered shark in fried bread). "Richard’s" is the original and most famous of the vendors, but numerous huts along the beach sell this unique local delicacy.More
#4
Port of Spain

Port of Spain

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Trinidad & Tobago’s capital Port of Spain enjoys a superb natural setting at the point where the mountains dip into the Gulf of Paria. One of the pleasures of this buzzing city is realizing that it doesn’t revolve around you, or tourism in general, with tall office buildings proclaiming its importance as a financial hub.That certainly doesn’t mean there aren’t things to see and do – far from it. Sights include the "Magnificent Seven," a group of fanciful mansions on Queen’s Park Savannah, the more modestly-sized "gingerbread houses," with their intricate woodwork, and the tropical paradise of the Botanical Gardens.Of course this is also the setting for Trinidad’s world-famous Carnival, with bars and clubs jumping year-round to soca, which, like calypso, was born here. During the day, do as the locals do and head for Independence Square where you’ll get an authentic taste of Trinidad from food stalls serving oysters, fresh fruit, and "doubles," a delicious local delicacy made from chick peas.More
#5
Queen's Park Savannah

Queen's Park Savannah

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Queen's Park Savannah, or “the Savannah" as Trinidadians call it, is the largest green space in the capital city, Port-of-Spain. The 296-acre park is almost 200 years old, making it one of the oldest and largest parks in the Caribbean. And Queen’s Park Savannah holds special significance on Trinidad because it’s the centerpoint for the island’s massive Carnival celebration. The Grand Stand at the southern end of the park and an adjacent temporary North Stand form the Big Yard where the Parade of Bands is broadcast and the Carnival King and Queen competitions are held. The park is also home to various sporting fields, gardens, concerts, and along the park’s edge, you’ll find the Magnificent Seven, a row of eccentric Victorian mansions, including Whitehall, Queen’s Royal College and Stollmeyer's Castle.More
#6
Nylon Pool

Nylon Pool

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Leave the hotel swimming pool behind on a trip to Tobago’s Nylon Pool. This huge offshore sandbar is a picturesque shallow bank about a mile from Pigeon Point, and a hugely popular spot for visitors to swim and snorkel under the Caribbean sun. Supposedly, the name was bestowed Princess Margaret when she visited the pool in 1962 and reportedly said the clear water reminded her of looking through a nylon stocking. The shallow corals of Buccoo Reef surround the sandy bottomed bathing area, making it a perfect spot to swim with local reef fish. Bring a mask and snorkel and keep watch for parrotfish, queen angels and trumpet fish flitting among the reefs.More
#7
Scarborough

Scarborough

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Scarborough is the capital city of Tobago. With around 17,000 people, it is home to nearly one-third of the island’s population. Europeans settled this historic town in the mid-1600s, and the English, Dutch and French battled for its control. In 1769, the English made Scarborough the island’s capital, and their mark can still be seen at Fort King George, an 18th-century garrison that overlooks the settlement. Today the ruins are well worth visiting for the spectacular views, and a small on-site museum offers a glimpse of the island’s history, with weapons, maps and pre-Columbian artifacts on display. While Scarborough does have a newly built deep-water port for cruise ships, the town itself maintains an unpretentious local feel, with wooden ginger-bread houses alongside more functional concrete structures. The Scarborough Mall, across from the harbor, is home to the tourism information office, and the best place to in town to go shopping.More
#8
Caroni Bird Sanctuary

Caroni Bird Sanctuary

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The scarlet ibis is the fiery-colored national bird of Trinidad and Tobago, and its daily flight home to roost at the Caroni Bird Sanctuary offers birdwatchers and nature lovers an outdoor experience unlike others in the Caribbean. Tour the mangrove swamps with a guide to learn about the area and see the ibis’s stunning plumage.More
#9
House of Parliament (Red House)

House of Parliament (Red House)

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During the Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897, Trinidad and Tobago decided to paint the government buildings of Port of Spain red in preparation of the celebrations. This resulted in the House of Parliament government building developing its nickname "Red House." Unfortunately, the original red painted House of Parliament burnt down in the 1903 from a fire that was an effect of the town's Water Riots. After the fire, the Red House was rebuilt and reopened in 1907, once again painted red.Today, the Red House is still home to Trinidad and Tobago's House of Parliament and though government proceedings happen there, visitors can still visit it. One of the top aspects to see in the building is the ceiling in the Chamber, which has striking Wedgewood blue with white gesso work.More
#10
San Fernando

San Fernando

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While Port of Spain is Trinidad’s political capital, the city of San Fernando is the industrial capital, and the center of Trinidad’s significant oil and gas industries. Even though San Fernando is primarily an industrial area, there are still many good reasons to visit. The Harris Promenade, at the city center, is an urban green space where you can find open air concerts. During the pre-colonial era, the natives called this area Anaparima, which means “one hill” and that single hill remains as San Fernando Hill, where you can enjoy a panoramic view of the city. Just south of San Fernando, you’ll find one of the island’s most popular attractions, Pitch Lake, the world’s largest naturally occurring tar pit, similar to the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. You can walk on the semi-solid surface of the lake to explore the unique environment. To the east of San Fernando, you can find the strange mud volcanoes of The Devil’s Woodyard.More

Frequently Asked Questions

The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
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