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Birds of Eden
Birds of Eden

Birds of Eden

Portion 11 & 12 of Kirbywood Farm Animal Alley The Crags, Plettenberg Bay , Garden Route, 6602

The Basics

You can explore nearly a mile (1.5 kilometers) of trails within the aviary on your own or—to learn more about the mission of Birds of Eden and the hundreds of species of birds, trees, and plants along the way—request a guide to lead you through the sanctuary.

The location of Birds of Eden just off the Garden Route makes it a popular stop on many sightseeing tours of South Africa. It can be visited alongside the neighboring Monkeyland Primate Sanctuary on tours that also include the Western Cape’s beaches and outdoor adventures.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Birds of Eden is a must-see for nature lovers, birders, and photographers.

  • To identify the birds in the sanctuary, purchase a bird identification booklet at reception or request a PDF version to view on your phone.

  • Birds of Eden has a no touching policy.

  • Bring binoculars to get a closer look at the birds in the far reaches of the dome.

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How to Get There

Birds of Eden is located on the Garden Route, next to the Monkeyland Primate Sanctuary and one mile (1.5 kilometers) off the N2. You can reach the sanctuary on a day trip from Port Elizabeth and Mossel Bay, or join a tour that stops by on a multi-day trip from Cape Town or Johannesburg.

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When to Get There

Birds of Eden is open for tours daily, and it takes most visitors one to two hours to explore the dome. The multitude of species in the enclosure means there is activity throughout the day, but visit in the morning for the most action.

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What to Look for at Birds of Eden

With more than 3,500 birds swooping overhead, nesting in the canopy, and swimming in the pools, you're sure to see a variety of species in the aviary, which might include an African Turaco or South American parrot, plus swans and sparrows. Birds aren’t the only creatures that have found a home in the sanctuary. Keep an eye out for giant fruit bats, golden-handed tamarins, and blue duikers—South Africa’s smallest antelope species.

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