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Things to do in Georgia, USA

Things to do in  Georgia

Welcome to Georgia

Although most travelers visit Georgia for Atlanta's top attractions, including CNN Studios and the World of Coca-Cola, opportunities for culture and entertainment reach well beyond the limits of the Peach State’s capital.

The coastal city of Savannah, Georgia's original colonial town, is a 3.5-hour drive from Atlanta through peach and pecan orchards. There, strengthen your sixth sense on an evening ghost tour of the many purportedly haunted buildings around the historic district, where the Spanish moss hanging from live oaks in every square is said to mark sites of tragedy. Or choose to delight your taste buds on a culinary tour of Paula Deen’s home town.

Other Georgia destinations include the historic mill town of Columbus, 1.5 hours east of Atlanta, where you'll find Civil War history, a botanical garden designed by Frederick Law Olmsted (creator of Central Park), and opportunities for white-water rafting and kayaking on the Chattahoochee River.

For easy day trips from Atlanta, there's nearby Macon, where the Georgia Music Hall of Fame honors the Allman Brothers, while the funky college town of Athens impresses football fans with the 92,000-seat Sanford Stadium.

Top 10 attractions in Georgia

#1
Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park

Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park

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The Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park commemorates the life, work, and legacy of the Civil Rights Movement leader. The center—which takes up several blocks in Sweet Auburn, the center of black Atlanta—includes King’s birth home and the Ebenezer Baptist Church, where both King’s father and grandfather served as ministers.More
#2
Colonial Park Cemetery

Colonial Park Cemetery

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This site served as Savannah’s main cemetery for more than a century following its establishment in 1750. With three subsequent expansions, six acres and over 9,000 graves, burials were cut off in 1853, and the site is now recognized as the oldest intact municipal cemetery in the city.When the site first opened, it was intended to serve as the burial ground for Christ Church Parish, but after its expansion, the cemetery was opened to all denominations. Since interments were closed prior to the start of the Civil War, no Confederate soldiers were buried here. There are, however, some burials of note; over 700 victims of the 1820 Yellow Fever epidemic are here, along with many victims of Savannah’s dueling era. Declaration of Independence signer Button Gwinnett is buried here, as well as Archibald Bulloch, the first president of Georgia, and James Habersham, an 18th-century acting royal Governor of the Province.Not surprisingly, Colonial Park Cemetery is home to a number of interesting ghost stories and legends. Paranormal enthusiasts have dubbed it “Paranormal Central,” with one of the most famous ghost stories involving Rene Asche Rondolier, a disfigured orphan who was accused of murdering girls. It is said that he was dragged to the swamp and lynched, and some locals believe he still haunts the cemetery, calling it Rene’s playground. Some local paranormal experts dispute the validity of this ghost story due to a lack of historical records.Other ghost stories revolve around Savannah’s voodoo culture. Although many have moved out of the city, years ago it was not uncommon for morning visitors to find remnants from a previous night’s ceremony. Soil was used from the graves, and some were actually robbed for use in these rituals. The small park adjacent to the cemetery is the location believed to be the site of Savannah’s dueling grounds.More
#3
Savannah Historic District

Savannah Historic District

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Grand antebellum homes and historic plazas lined with live oaks are just some of the sights that define Savannah’s Historic District. Considered the heart of the city, the Historic District is not only the centerpiece of a Savannah vacation but also where to find the highest concentration of bars, restaurants, and historic attractions.More
#4
World of Coca-Cola

World of Coca-Cola

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Boasting a collection of more than 200 historical artifacts, a 4-D theater experience, and interactive museum exhibits, the World of Coca-Cola® in Atlanta does far more than whet your whistle for a (though it does that, too). Pay homage to the birthplace of the world’s most popular soft drink and learn how a simple beverage became a global sensation and a must-see Atlanta attraction.More
#5
Savannah River Street

Savannah River Street

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It is virtually impossible for Savannah visitors to miss River Street. A broad waterfront promenade lined with shopping, dining, and entertainment venues, River Street is one of the main arteries of the historic city. The street also features a pedestrian-only path, perfect for leisurely strolls with unbeatable Savannah River views.More
#6
National Center for Civil and Human Rights

National Center for Civil and Human Rights

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The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is a cultural center in downtown Atlanta that seeks to connect the American Civil Rights Movement to today’s Global Human Rights Movements. Their purpose is to create a safe space for visitors to explore the fundamental rights of all human beings. The Center's goal is to inspire and empower visitors to join the ongoing dialogue about human rights in their own communities.The Center has both permanent and temporary exhibitions on different topics relating to civil and human rights. Exhibitions explore the history of the civil rights movement in the US during the 1950s and 1960s. Others focus on Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life and work in the fight for equal rights. Some exhibitions focus more on present-day issues of human rights and how certain groups are depicted in the media. These exhibits aim to help visitors gain a deeper understanding of human rights and how they affect the lives of every person.More
#7
Savannah City Market

Savannah City Market

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Dating back to the 18th century, Savannah City Market has long been the commercial and social center of historic downtown Savannah, Georgia. The market is known locally as the “art and soul” of Savannah, a nod to the numerous art galleries, boutiques, and restaurants that make it such an important part of Savannah's social fabric.More
#8
Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

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The Cathedral of St John the Baptist, a Roman Catholic establishment, is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Savannah. The colonial charter of the city originally prohibited Roman Catholics from settling here for fear they would be more loyal to the Spanish authorities, but after the American Revolution, the prohibition on Roman Catholics began to fade.French Catholic immigrants escaping slave rebellions in Haiti established Savannah’s first parish just before the end of the 18th century. As the number of Catholics continued to increase in Savannah, a second church was dedicated in 1839 and construction on the new Cathedral of St John the Baptist began in 1873. It was completed in 1896 as the spires were added.Although the cathedral was almost entirely destroyed by a fire in 1898, it was painstakingly rebuilt and rededicated in 1900, when it also received new murals and decorations. Restoration and renovations continued on throughout the reign of several bishops, and among the most significant elements that remain today are the stained glass windows.More
#9
Atlanta CNN Center

Atlanta CNN Center

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The Atlanta CNN Center serves as headquarters for the cable TV news giant, CNN. Inside, visitors can see the 24-hour news cycle in action with an insider’s look at newsrooms, control rooms, production studios, and sets, all in addition to the interactive exhibits that chronicle the network’s history.More
#10
Senoia

Senoia

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Senoia is a small suburb of Atlanta, GA with a population of about 3,300 people and was originally settled in the mid 1800s. This quiet town has gained more attention recently due to its role in the television and film industry. Senoia's significant number of historical buildings in the downtown area give it an interesting atmosphere in which to film. It has been home to several movies over the years includingFried Green Tomatoes, Sweet Home Alabama, andDrop Dead Diva.More recently the town has become the setting for the AMC television series The Walking Dead. The town doubles for the town of Woodbury, the fictitious setting of the show. Visitors can walk through town and see some of the buildings that have been featured in the series. Tens of thousands of people visit Senoia each year to catch a glimpse of their favorite show, and stores, cafes, and tours have been created cater to them.More

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