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Things to do in Norway

Things to do in  Norway

Welcome to Norway

Norway: land of breathtaking fjords, cosmopolitan cities, and Scandinavian design. In the capital city of Oslo, visit top attractions such as the Viking Ship Museum and Vigeland Sculpture Park, and get a taste of Norwegian culture on a food tour. On the west coast, UNESCO-protected fjords, craggy coastlines, and Bergen—the so-called City of Seven Mountains—beckon outdoor enthusiasts. Those in search of the northern lights and winter activities—from dogsledding to snowmobile safaris—should head for Tromso, while train buffs won't want to miss a trip on the Bergen and Flam railways, considered among the world's most scenic train journeys.

Top 10 attractions in Norway

#1
Tromso Fjords

Tromso Fjords

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Thanks to its spectacular setting among a series of islands and skerries laced with waterways and scalloped inlets, Tromso is the epicenter of day trips out into the fjords bordering the Norwegian Sea. These long, narrow sea inlets are characterized by steep, mountainous slopes carved out by glaciation during the last Ice Age.More
#2
Sognefjord

Sognefjord

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The Sognefjord in western Norway is the largest in the country and the second deepest in the world, with depths reaching more than 1,000 meters at some points and cliffs rising more than 1,000 meters above the water. Stretching more than 200 kilometers from the coast to the village of Skjolden, the fjord is also the second longest in the world. There are several interesting stops for tourists along the fjord, including Jostedalsbreen, the largest glacier in mainland Europe and the Naeroyfjord, a branch of the Sognefjord that shrinks to only 300 meters across at its narrowest point. The latter is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is known for its incredibly dramatic scenery. Notable villages include Gudvangen, which sits on the Naeroyfjord, and Flam, which is an endpoint of the Flam Railway, which climbs more than 800 meters up to Myrdal in just 20 kilometers, making it the steepest unassisted railway climb in the world. Near the innermost point of the Sognefjord are three of Norway’s famous wooden stave churches, found in the villages of Kaupanger, Urnes and Borgund.More
#3
Mt. Floyen (Floyfjellet)

Mt. Floyen (Floyfjellet)

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Mount Fløyen (Fløyfjellet**)**towers 1,310 feet (399 meters) over Bergen and offers panoramic views of the city and surrounding landscape from its summit. A popular hiking destination, the mountain features a funicular railway and a network of scenic walking and biking trails that run throughout the area.More
#4
Hardangerfjord

Hardangerfjord

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Norway’s second-longest fjord, Hardangerfjord stretches nearly 124 miles (200 kilometers) inland from the Atlantic. Highlights include a massive glacier covering more than 77 square miles (200 square kilometers) and Troll’s Tongue (Trolltunga) rock, hanging 2,300 feet (701 meters) above Ringedalsvatnet Lake in Odda.More
#5
Geiranger

Geiranger

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Tucked in the folds of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Geirangerfjord, the small coastal town of Geiranger is the gateway to Norway’s mighty fjords and a popular stop for cruise ships. Disney fans will recognize the town’s dramatic backdrop: Its jagged sea cliffs, pine-covered valleys, and iridescent waters served as inspiration forFrozen.More
#6
Viking Ship Museum (Vikingskipshuset)

Viking Ship Museum (Vikingskipshuset)

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Set on Oslo’s Bygdoy Peninsula, the Viking Ship Museum (Vikingskipshuset) houses an extensive collection of Viking-era artifacts discovered around Oslo Fjord. The museum is best known for its Viking ships, which have been painstakingly reconstructed and elegantly displayed in pristine white galleries.More
#7
Polar Museum (Polarmuseet)

Polar Museum (Polarmuseet)

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Found in a dockside wooden warehouse dating from 1837, which served as Tromsø’s Customs House until the early 1970s, the Polar Museum celebrates the city’s history as the epicenter of Arctic exploration and of Norway’s controversial sealing industry. The museum opened in 1978, on the 50-year anniversary of polar explorer Roald Amundsen setting sail from Tromsø on his ill-fated last expedition. The permanent displays showcase the harsh lives of the indigenous Sami peoples in the Arctic during the 16th and 17th centuries and highlights the desperate need to survive that fueled the hunting and trapping of seals, polar bears, reindeer, whales and walruses almost to the point of extinction for their meat and skins. A number of gruesome hunting tools and traps are on display among the stuffed polar bears and animal furs.The museum also pays homage to Norway’s great explorers: Fridtjof Nansen—who opened up the Arctic Circle in the 19th century—and Amundsen, who beat British explorer Robert Scott in the epic race to the South Pole in December 1911. A vast collection of memorabilia relating to his voyages includes a model of the airship Norge, in which he flew over the North Pole in 1926.More
#8
Oslofjord

Oslofjord

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Norway’s cosmopolitan capital lies at the head of Oslofjord, a narrow body of water 68 miles (107 kilometers) in length that leads out to the strait of Skagerrak and eventually to the Baltic and North Seas. The fjord’s islets are its main attraction, home to sandy beaches, cycling and hiking routes, and historic lighthouses.More
#9
Karl Johans Gate

Karl Johans Gate

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Stretching from Oslo Central Station to the Royal Palace, Karl Johans gate is Oslo’s main thoroughfare. Named after King Charles III John (Karl Johan), the street is home to many of thecity’s top attractions, including the Royal Palace, Stortinget, National Theatre and Central Station.During Oslo’s short summer, residents flock to the beer gardens lining the street for al fresco drinks. Come winter, a pond along the street transforms into an ice skating rink. Throughout theyear, restaurants, cafes and bars lining the street fill up with both locals and visitors. Much of Oslo’s best shops can be found along the street and the smaller streets branching from it.More
#10
Bygdøy Peninsula

Bygdøy Peninsula

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Jutting out into Oslo Fjord, the Bygdøy Peninsula is a one-stop leisure destination just west side of the city center. A clutch of Norway’s most popular museums are found here along with hiking and cycling trails, beautiful – if small – beaches at Huk and Paradisbukta, plus several cafés and seafood restaurants. Come sunny days, the peninsula is full to bursting with Oslo families enjoying the peninsula’s laid-back vibe and the organic farm at the Royal Manor, which is the summer residence of King Harald V.Altogether Bygdøy is home to the Neo-Gothic castle of Oscarshall, the Holocaust Center in the austere Villa Grande, and no less than five museums. Of these, the Viking Ship, Fram, Maritime and Kon-Tiki museums deal with Norway’s illustrious nautical heritage, while the open-air Norwegian Folk Museum concerns itself with Norway’s cultural past. It displays a colorful collection of Sami national costumes from Lapland alongside 150-odd reconstructed buildings including traditional Sami goahti and a magical 13th-century wooden stave church from Gol, a small town north of Oslo.More

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