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Things to Do in Finland

The most sparsely populated country in the European Union, Finland attracts travelers in search of wide open spaces and unspoiled swaths of beautiful nature. But city-dwellers will find plenty to love as well: The bulk of the country’s population is concentrated in the capital, Helsinki, located on the southern coast. Known for its cutting-edge design and tech scene, it’s a truly cosmopolitan city that’s home to top-notch museums; stately historic buildings; and cool restaurants, bars, and markets (be sure try local delicacies like squeaky "bread" cheese with cloudberry jam). With its extra-long words, the Finnish language can be tricky to master, so a local guide can be helpful for navigating the city. A typical Helsinki tour includes stops at the Rock Church (Temppeliaukio), Senate Square, the Parliament Building, and the Sibelius Monument. Day trips from the city include the Suomenlinna sea fortress, the medieval city of Porvoo, Nuuksio National Park, or picturesque Tallinn, just a quick boat trip across the Baltic Sea in Estonia. Up north in Lapland, where the nights are long, you’ll find an amazing vantage spot to photograph the Northern Lights and engage in unforgettable wintertime activities. Hop aboard a dog sled for a tour of the tundra, explore an amethyst mine, go snowmobiling, do some ice fishing, or visit a reindeer farm.
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Parliament House of Finland (Eduskuntatalo)
42 Tours and Activities

Finland’s Parliament House, also called Eduskuntatalo, is not only the home of the session hall that hosts the 200-seat parliament, but is also somewhat of a massive work of art within the capital of Helsinki. It’s a monumental, square building constructed in a classical style – the result of an architecture competition held in 1923 that was won by the architecture firm of Borg-Sirén-Åberg. Standing on Arcadia Hill, the exterior is dominated by strong but simple geometry, a lot of granite and tall Corinthian columns. The whole design looks more functional and industrial rather than elegant and ornate, but reflects a style that was popular in the 1920s. Noteworthy is that the building was constructed using mostly Finnish materials, such as the reddish Kalvola Granite used on the façade and furniture made of oak, curly birch and walnut.

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National Museum of Finland (Suomen Kansallismuseo)
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The impressive National Museum of Finland (or Suomen Kansallismuseo) looks a bit like a Gothic church with its stonework and tower. Built in 1916 and extensively renovated in 2000, the museum's rooms cover different periods of Finnish history. The Treasure Trove has coins, silver, weaponry, medals and jewelery. The Prehistory of Finland is a large, permanent exhibition of prehistory and archaeological finds. A Land and its People shows life in Finland before industrialization. The Realm covers the history of Finland in the 13th - 17th centuries when it was under Swedish rule and an independent duchy of the Russian empire. The permanent exhibition, "Suomi Finland 1900", explores 20th-century Finland and was opened in April 2012. There are also changing displays of church relics, ethnography and cultural exhibitions.

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Helsinki Olympic Stadium
27 Tours and Activities

Located a mile from the city center in the Töölö district, Helsinki Olympic Stadium (Helsingin Olympiastadion) is the biggest arena in Finland, with 40,600 spectator spots. Finland was originally meant to host the 1940 Summer Olympics, but the outbreak of World War II delayed the games until 1952, when the country finally got to host the big event. Today, the stadium is home to the national soccer team and houses big-name concerts and sports events every year.

For views of all of Helsinki and its downtown, take the elevator to the top of the 72.21-meter Stadium Tower. Why the idiosyncratic height? Well, that was the gold-medal winning result of Finnish athlete Matti Järvinen’s javelin throw in the 1932 Summer Olympics, of course! Aside from its 14-story viewing tower, the Helsinki Olympic Stadium also has a restaurant, an Olympics museum and, quirkily enough, a youth hostel.

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Helsinki Cathedral (Tuomiokirkko)
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The skyline of Helsinki is dominated by Tuomiokirkko, or the Helsinki Lutheran Cathedral. The green domes, white building and zinc rooftop statues of the twelve apostles of the magnificent Lutheran church stand tall and proud looking over the city to the sea. Built between 1830 and 1852, it replaced a smaller 18th century church, and was originally called St. Nicholas' Church in homage to the Tsar of Russia, Grand Duke Nicholas I. After Finnish independence from Russia 1917, the church was renamed and in 1959 it became a cathedral of the Evangelical Lutheran denomination. Designed by a German architect Carl Ludwig Engel who laid out the whole of Senate Square, the exterior is Neo-Classical with columns and statues and in comparison, inside seems rather plain. The design was later altered by Ernst Lohrmann who added the zinc apostles and a few extra small domes. There is room for 1,300 worshipers and an altarpiece flanked by angels. The suitably atmospheric crypt is now a cafe.

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Helsinki Central Station
40 Tours and Activities

For thousands of commuters, Helsinki’s Central Railway Station is the main traffic hub from which buses, the metro and numerous local and long distance trains arrive and depart. In fact, with roughly 200,000 daily visitors, it is Finland’s most visited structure. The building also happens to be one of the landmarks of the city and looks back on over 100 years of history. Designed in 1909 by Eliel Saarinen and opened in 1919, the Railway Station’s most distinctive features are the big clock tower and the two towering figures of two heavily muscled, half-naked men holding big globes of light. Another notable feature is the red Finnish granite that was used to clad the façades of the Central Railway Station. The granite originated in Hanko, the southernmost region of Finland and is believed to be over 400 million years old.

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Market Square (Kauppatori)
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Market Square, also called Kauppatori, hosts Helsinki’s most famous open-air market with great opportunities for shopping. The stalls sell everything from traditional dishes and snacks to crafts and souvenirs. It’s located right by the sea and is a place where locals often come to find a fresh and cheap lunch, including freshly caught salmon, local mushrooms and reindeer meat. Souvenir hunters can find the typical Russian fur hats, lots of carved kitchenware, knitted sweaters, gloves and hats, as well as delicious reindeer salami.

In summer, it’s nice to sit in one of the outdoor cafés and enjoy the sun, but even in the midst of winter, the many hot drinks that are offered everywhere and the heated café tent make Market Square a fun place to visit. In the middle of the square you can find an obelisk marking a visit by Alexandra Feodorovna, the last Tsaritsa of Russia and if you plan on taking a ferry to Sweden, the adjoining south harbor is the place to go.

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More Things to Do in Finland

Mannerheim Museum

Mannerheim Museum

2 Tours and Activities

The Mannerheim Museum is dedicated to the life and times of Finland’s national hero, Gustaf Mannerheim. As the country’s commander-in-chief during World War II, Mannerheim saved Finland from the clutches of Russia, and as the post-war president, he also managed to successfully negotiate Finland’s peace agreements with the United Kingdom and Soviet Union. Also on his impressive resume is the fact that during this lifetime, he managed to traverse 14,000 kilometers along the Silk Road from Samarkand to Beijing.

The Mannerheim Museum is housed in what was once honoree’s home, which he rented from chocolate magnate Karl Fazer from 1924 until his death in 1951. The home has been preserved in its original state, and most of the furnishings date back to the 1940s. A great place to visit for anyone interested in 20th-century European history and the Finnish psyche, the museum houses Mannerheim’s basic bedroom, a collection of hundreds of medals and other honors he received.

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Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma

Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma

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The Kiasma Museum of Modern Art (or Nykytaiteen Museo) is housed in a curvaceous and quirky chalk-white building. It exhibits a rapidly growing collection of Finnish and international modern art from the 1960s to the 1990s. Leading Finnish artists in the permanent collection include Nina Roos, Susanne Gottberg, Jussi Nivi and the homoerotic illustrator Touko Laaksonen, better known as Tom of Finland. Some of the international artists represented are Nan Goldin, Richard Serra, Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman. In addition to its impressive collection of visual art, the Kiasma regularly presents performance art, dance, music and films. Innovative and engaging, the Kiasma is not only a world-class museum but also a laboratory for artistic experimentation and expression. The focus is definitely on the Finnish penchant for the offbeat. The cafe and beer terrace are also very popular in summer.

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Finlandia Hall (Finlandiatalo)

Finlandia Hall (Finlandiatalo)

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Finlandia Hall (or Finlandiatalo) is Helsinki's concert and congress hall. It is also an architecture masterpiece by famous Finnish architect Alvar Aalto (1898 - 1976) who was sometimes referred to as the Father of Modernism. In Helsinki, Aalto wanted to realize the major plan for a grand square and avenue flanked by cultural buildings, including the Parliament Building, first thought of by Eliel Saarinen in 1917 when Finland became independent of Russia. He drew plans for a grand center to Helsinki in 1961 and modified them in 1964 and 1971; you could say the city was a lifelong project of his.

Finlandia Hall was designed in 1962 and built between 1967 and 1972. The congress wing followed in 1973 - 75. For Aalto it was a major part of realizing his grand plan. The building shows many of his ongoing concerns - few right angles, design around existing trees on the site, the use of Italian marble and Finnish granite.

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Helsinki City Hall (Kaupungintalo)

Helsinki City Hall (Kaupungintalo)

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Helsinki City Hall, also called Kaupungintalo, didn’t always have an administrative purpose. In fact, it was originally designed as a cultural entertainment hotel by the famous German architect Carl Ludvig Engel back in 1833. The beautiful white and blue façade in the imperial style has remained, but today, most of the classical interiors have been replaced by more modern glass structures. In 1913, the former grand hotel was turned into Helsinki City Hall and although it has served as a hospital during the First World War, the building has since then hosted the offices of the mayor of Helsinki. There are also several other rooms for City Board and City Council meetings, which take place every other Wednesday in the council chamber. If you love architecture, you can simply bring your camera and wander, but visitors are also able to attend various events and exhibitions inside the building.

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Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo)

Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo)

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Home to both the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra and the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, the Helsinki Music Centre (Musiikkitalo) is the Finnish capital’s main concert hall. Sitting opposite Parliament House in the prestigious Töölönlahti district, the building and its copper facade may look gargantuan from the outside, but actually, most of its rooms are underground.

Home to the Sibelius Academy as well as Finland’s national orchestras, the center was unveiled in 2011. With a modern and understated design, the center’s unusual interior layout features weaving hallways, as well as a unique main hall, where up to 1,704 visitors are seated in a full circle around the orchestra. Designed to sit in harmony with the stately buildings that surround it, the Helsinki Music Centre and its design have been well-received.

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Seurasaari Open-Air Museum

Seurasaari Open-Air Museum

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Helsinki City Museum

Helsinki City Museum

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One of the largest museums in all of Finland, the Helsinki Art Museum, is located within the Tennis Palace complex in central Helsinki. However, the museum also has a regional art museum in Uusimaa, keeps the Kluuvi Gallery, and also maintains much of the city's public domain art. The main museum itself has been located in the historic Tennis Palace space since 1999 and hosts one of the largest collections of art anywhere in all the Nordic countries. All in all, the art museum has a collection of nearly 9,000 pieces, most of which come from modern era Finland.

The vast majority of the museums exhibitions are temporary, and the works found within the museum are not necessarily locked into any particular region, history, or genre. Both contemporary and modern works are displayed at the museum and art is often brought in on exchange from partners in the Americas, Asia, Africa, and elsewhere in Europe.

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Ateneum Art Museum (Konstmuseet Ateneum)

Ateneum Art Museum (Konstmuseet Ateneum)

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The Ateneum Art Museum (or Konstmuseet Ateneum) houses Finnish paintings and sculptures from the 18 century to the 1950s. There's also a small, interesting collection of 19th and early-20th century foreign art, including a copy of Auguste Rodin's bronze The Thinker, and paintings by Van Gogh, Gaugin and Cézanne. The building itself dates from 1887. Downstairs is a cafe, good bookshop and reading room.

The list of painters at the Ateneum reads like a 'who's who' of Finnish art, housing paintings and sculptures by Albert Edelfelt, Akseli Gallen-Kallela, the Von Wright brothers and Pekka Halonen. Pride of place goes to the prolific Gallen-Kallela's triptych from the Kalevala depicting Väinämöinen's pursuit of the maiden Aino.

The Finnish National Gallery's other main museum, the Sinebrychoff, contains the largest collection of Italian, Dutch and Flemish paintings in Finland. The museum also features Russian and Karelian icons, silver, porcelain and furniture.

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SEA LIFE® Helsinki

SEA LIFE® Helsinki

4 Tours and Activities
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