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Things to do in Belfast

Things to do in  Belfast

Welcome to Belfast

Often overlooked in favor of the Irish Republic’s lively capital Dublin, Belfast is a city rich with history, culture, and Northern Irish "craic." Having shed its war-torn reputation in the past few years, Belfast has undergone a radical transformation and now offers an abundance of museums, restaurants, and swanky accommodation. Top sights on any Belfast city tour are the Titanic Belfast in the Titanic Quarter, City Hall, and the cultural hub of Cathedral Quarter, where St. Anne’s Cathedral—also known as Belfast Cathedral—and a maze of cobbled streets lend themselves well to walking tours. History buffs can take a guided tour of the infamous Crumlin Road Gaol, formerly filled with dangerous convicts, and for maritime enthusiasts and families, the HMS Caroline is a great place to spend the afternoon. Belfast’s proximity to Giant’s Causeway makes the Northern Ireland capital an ideal launchpad for day trips to and along the Causeway Coastal Route, whose other highlights include Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge, Dunluce Castle, and the Bushmills Distillery. And fans of the hit HBO show "Games of Thrones" will jump at the opportunity to take a sightseeing tour to Cushendun Caves, Carrickfergus Castle, the macabre Dark Hedges road, and other GoT filming locations.

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Top 10 attractions in Belfast

Titanic Belfast
#1

Titanic Belfast

Since opening its doors in 2012 to mark the 100th anniversary of the Titanic’s fateful maiden voyage, Titanic Belfast has rocketed to the top of Northern Ireland’s tourist attractions, drawing over a million visitors in its first year. It seems fitting that the city should host the world’s largest Titanic visitor experience; after all, this was the city where the world’s most luxurious ship was built and first launched. Today, the area of Belfast Harbor that once housed the RMS Titanic has been renamed the Titanic Quarter and is dominated by the towering silver façade of the Titanic Belfast, a remarkable building fashioned from four ship-hull-shaped wings. The futuristic building is home to the state-of-the-art Titanic Belfast exhibition, which spreads over 6 floors and includes interactive discovery zones, full-scale reconstructions, real-life accounts and mind-blowing special effects....
Belfast City Hall
#2

Belfast City Hall

Belfast City Hall was built to commemorate the event of Belfast becoming a city, having been granted the status in 1888 by Queen Victoria in recognition of the contributions of Belfast in the industries of linen, rope, tobacco, engineering and shipbuilding. This imposing structure of Portland stone has a copper dome topping out at 173 feet high, as well as a statue of Queen Victoria celebrating her jubilee standing out front. Many other statues and monuments can be found on the surrounding grounds, including the Thane Memorial for the victims of the Titanic sinking, which was expanded in 2012 to become the Titanic Memorial Garden. The memorial garden contains a nine-meter-long plinth containing bronze plaques with the names of all of the victims and was the first memorial to include the names of all who died, both crew members and passengers....
Shankill
#3

Shankill

Shankill, derived from the Irish word for “Old Church,” is a predominantly loyalist working-class area of West Belfast. It’s known as “Original Belfast” and dates back to 455 A.D., while being known for its role as a central hub for many loyalist paramilitary organizations during the time of "The Troubles." Shankill Road, the main artery of the neighborhood, is one of the oldest settlements in Belfast and dates back to the Stone Age. The area came to prominence in the late 19th century as a center of Belfast’s linen industry. The Shankill Road Peace Walls are adorned with unionist symbols, such as Union Jacks and murals of the British Royal Family, which are key draws for tourists. The murals here are political, historical and community focused. Art on the gable walls depicts scenes as one of volunteers who died as a result of the area’s conflicts....
Belfast Falls Road
#4

Belfast Falls Road

Falls Road, derived from the Irish word for “district of the falls or hedges,” is a predominantly working-class area of western Belfast. The neighborhood is known for its role in “The Troubles,” having served as the central hub for many of the nationalist organizations of the time, and is divided from Shankill Road by one of the peace walls of Belfast. Many famous Republican murals can be found in the area, such as the mural of hunger striker Bobby Sands on the wall of the Sinn Féin shop and office. Sands died after a hunger strike in Maze Prison, which left nine other prisoners dead. There are a few murals where you might notice a few repetitive motifs and symbols, such as a phoenix rising from the ashes, which stands for Ireland emerging from the flames of the 1916 Easter Rising....
Titanic's Dock and Pump-House
#5

Titanic's Dock and Pump-House

Back in the early 20th century, the RMS Titanic sat in this vast 900-foot (274-meter) dock—then known as Thompson Dry Dock—while workers toiled to put the final touches on the luxurious liner. Next door, an Edwardian-era pump house, which was used to drain water from the dock, now houses original machinery and Titanic-inspired exhibits....
Belfast Peace Wall
#6

Belfast Peace Wall

Dating back to 1969, the Belfast Peace Walls, or Peace Lines, are a series of barriers that were put up between Irish Nationalist and Unionist neighborhoods throughout Northern Ireland. Originally intended to be only temporary structures between Protestant and Catholic neighborhoods, many of the walls have proven effective, and have been lengthened, strengthened and made more permanent fixtures. Many of the exteriors have been adorned with murals, much like the former Berlin Wall, making the Belfast Peace Walls a popular attraction. There are currently 48 peace lines in Northern Ireland, stretching over 21 miles (34 km) in total, mostly in Belfast. The peace lines range in length from a few hundred yards to several miles long and may stand as high as 25 feet in some places. The walls are constructed of iron, brick and/or steel, while there are only a limited number of gates that allow access to cross through the walls between the neighborhoods....
Crumlin Road Gaol
#7

Crumlin Road Gaol

Crumlin Road features two imposing structures of Belfast’s criminal justice system, the Crumlin Road Gaol (Jail) and Courthouse. The jail opened in 1845 and the courthouse five years later, though neither have been in service since the late 1990ss. Crumlin Road Jail is the only Victorian-era prison remaining in Northern Ireland and is commonly referred to as “The Crum.” The Crumlin Road Gaol is a black basalt and red sandstone structure of four wings branching out from a central circle. The jail has been the site of numerous breakouts, bombings and protests over the years, and despite being referred to as the Alcatraz of Europe, there were a number of successful escape attempts, the first in 1866. It has housed such notable inmates as Ian Paisley, Eamon de Valera, Michael Stone and Lenny Murphy. Gallows were not included in the original design, meaning executions took place in public view....
Queen's University Belfast
#8

Queen's University Belfast

Just as Dublin has Trinity, so Belfast has Queen's. It's the city's top university and a center of green and calm. Neo-Gothic and neo-Tudor buildings mingle with less majestic fare. Over 20,000 students attend, so if you come in term-time there's plenty of people-watching to be done as the campus goes about its business. It was founded in 1849 and its main building was designed by Charles Lanyon. However, the main pleasure for the visitor is less its history and more just strolling around the grounds enjoying the tranquil enclave and the toney streets surrounding the campus....
Belfast Customs House
#10

Belfast Customs House

Belfast’s customs house was the city’s first neoclassical building, built in 1856 in the High Italian Renaissance, or “Palazzo” style. It is generally considered to be one of Belfast’s finest structures and features carvings of angels and classical deities representing manufacture, commerce, industry and peace. Figures of Britannia, flanked by the lion and unicorn of the British seal, as well as Neptune and Mercury, look down from the pediment over the entrance. The structure is meant to convey the great power of the British Empire under Queen Victoria. The building's steps have long been a site where many of Belfast’s orators would give speeches, as well as the site of many protests. There is a bronze statue of the “speaker” that serves as a popular spot for photos. Customs House Square is also a major venue for outdoor concerts and street entertainment in Belfast....

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Giant's Causeway Tours from Belfast

Giant's Causeway Tours from Belfast

Top activities in Belfast

Giants causeway, Game of thrones

Giants causeway, Game of thrones

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