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Things to do in Germany

Things to do in  Germany

Welcome to Germany

Germany offers a path for every kind of traveler, whether it leads toward the castles of Neuschwanstein and Linderhof, a glass of local wine in Rhine Valley, or across to Austria's Salzburg Lake District, an area synonymous with the Von Trapp family and The Sound of Music. For history buffs, stories of the Cold War abound in Berlin, and day trips to World War II memorial sites offer a somber and significant look at the past. If you find yourself in Munich in the fall it can only mean one thing: a stop at Oktoberfest, the world's largest beer festival, for a taste of Bavarian brews, culture, and food.

Top 10 attractions in Germany

#1
Zugspitze

Zugspitze

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Located close to the Austrian border and soaring to a height of 9,718 feet (2,962 meters), the snow-crowned Zugspitze is Germany's highest mountain and one of its most popular ski resorts. The views from the top are spectacular, spanning the German and Austrian Alps.More
#2
St. Thomas Church (Thomaskirche)

St. Thomas Church (Thomaskirche)

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One of two places of worship in the center of Leipzig, St. Thomas Church is home to the remains of composer Johann Sebastian Bach, who once worked as the church’s music director. The current building dates to the end of the 15th century, and the roof above its vaulted ceiling is one of the steepest in Germany. Martin Luther preached at St. Thomas on Pentecost Sunday in 1539, but the church may be best known for the St. Thomas Boys’ Choirs founded centuries earlier, in 1212.A 223-foot (68-m) church tower rises above the surrounding skyline, featuring four bells that ring hourly and on the quarter hour. The church contains two organs, one of which was built in semblance to Bach's in the Paulinekirche—as well as a Gothic altar. Next to the church is a sculpture of Bach, added in 1908.More
#3
Mercedes-Benz Museum

Mercedes-Benz Museum

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Spread across nine levels and showcasing over 160 rare vehicles and car-related artifacts, Stuttgart’s Mercedes-Benz Museum is a must-visit destination for automotive enthusiasts. Debuted in 2006 next to the city’s Daimler factory, the museum is also an architectural marvel, thanks to its sleek, double-helix design.More
#4
Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds

Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds

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A vast tract of untended land southeast of Nuremberg's medieval city center, the Nazi Party Rally Grounds were once the stage for some of Adolf Hitler's most infamous and dangerous speeches during the rise of the Third Reich. The nearby Documentation Center museum chronicles the terrors inflicted by the Nazi party during World War II.More
#5
Dresden Frauenkirche

Dresden Frauenkirche

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The Frauenkirche in Dresden was built between 1726 and 1743. Its dome collapsed on Feb. 15, 1945, during the bombings of World War II. After the war, the ruins of the church were left as a war memorial. Once Dresden and the rest of East Germany were reunified with West Germany, reconstruction on the church began and was completed by 2005. As much as possible, the reconstruction of the church followed the original plans and methods and used the original materials. The church now serves as a symbol of reconciliation.The reconstruction of the church was supported by donations from people all around the world. In order to honor those who donated, the church set up an exhibition area, which explains what was left after the destruction and what was was needed to start the rebuilding process. The exhibit includes original documents and finds from the archaeological site. Photographs and sketches outline the process from when the reconstruction idea was made public until the consecration of the church in 2005. There is also a computer to search for names of supporters.A variety of guided tours of the church are available, and visitors can also climb the tower for views of the city.More
#6
Holsten Gate (Holstentor)

Holsten Gate (Holstentor)

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The Holsten Gate (Holstentor), a medieval city gate that marks the border of Old Town in Lübeck, Germany is known for its two imposing iron-clad turrets. Dating back to 1464, the landmark—which is also known as the Crooked Gate due to the seemingly sunken south tower—is now home to a museum about Lübeck’s medieval past.More
#7
Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom)

Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom)

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With its imposing Gothic façade and dramatic twin towers, the Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom) is the city’s most recognized landmark. Protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the magnificent cathedral is one of the most important in Germany and dominates the city skyline.More
#8
Karl-Theodor-Bridge (Alte Brucke)

Karl-Theodor-Bridge (Alte Brucke)

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The Karl-Theodor-Bridge (Alte Brucke) in Heidelberg is a sandstone pedestrian bridge that goes across the Neckar River linking the old town on one side with the Neuenheim district on the other. It was built in 1786, and even though there were several other bridges before it in this location, it was the first one made of stone. On the city side of the bridge, there are two towers that once formed part of the city walls. They contain old dungeons which were used to hold criminals. Between the towers, you can see a plaque honoring the Austrian troops who helped defend the bridge against an attack from the French in 1799.Another feature visitors will notice is a statue of a monkey holding a mirror. The monkey represents the idea that neither those who lived within the city walls nor those who lived outside the city were any better than the other, and that they should look over their shoulder as the cross the bridge to remember this. Other sculptures on the bridge include a monument to Prince Elector Carl Theodor, who had the bridge built, and one devoted to the Roman goddess Minerva.More
#9
New Palace (Neues Palais)

New Palace (Neues Palais)

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The Neues Palais (New Palace) is the largest 18th-century structure in Potsdam’s Sanssouci Park. Situated on the western side of the park, the building was completed under Prussian King Friedrich II in 1769. It is the last palace that Frederick the Great built in the Potsdam park grounds — no further baroque palaces were built in Germany after this one. Once the royal residence during the German Empire (1871-1918), the New Palace is made up of opulent main reception rooms, beautiful galleries, and luxurious royal apartments.Today, the New Palace is home to the University of Potsdam’s philosophy department, and various other institutes. Out of the 200 palatial rooms, some 60 can be viewed by visitors. Among these are the Grottensaal (Grotto Hall), the Marmorgalerie (Marble Gallery), and the guest apartments. The Visitor’s Hall is located in the historic Südtorgebäude (South Tower), and is a reception point for groups of visitors as well as a multimedia information center for adults and for children. A bronze model located here allows blind and visually impaired visitors to literally get a feel for the park. The New Palace also has an on-site restaurant (Fredersdorf), which combines the fresh, modern kitchen with a royal backdrop.More
#10
Dusseldorf Old Town (Altstadt)

Dusseldorf Old Town (Altstadt)

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The traditional heart of the city and one of Germany’s most famous nightlife districts, Dusseldorf’s Old Town (Altstadt) is where visitors spend the majority of their time, home to many of the city’s top attractions. As well as the scenic Rheinuferpromenade running along the waterfront and the famous Königsallee shopping boulevard just a couple of blocks east, highlights of the Old Town include the Burgplatz, with its landmark castle tower and unique City Monument; the Neander-church and Old City Hall (Rathaus), two of the only buildings still standing after WWII; and a number of museums, including the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen and the Filmmuseum.The historic district is at its most atmospheric in the evening hours when locals and tourists gather to drink and dance at “the longest bar in the world” – the nickname given to the almost 300 bars, bier-halles and pubs that stretch throughout the area, built so close together that the bar counters are said to run from one venue to the next. There’s a huge range of nightclubs, music venues and cocktail bars to choose from, but be sure to head to one of the traditional brew pubs to sample local specialty, Altbier, a dark beer brewed in Dusseldorf since the 19th century.More

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