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Things to do in Lake District

Things to do in  Lake District

Welcome to Lake District

With its tumbling green hills and glittering lakes, it’s easy to see why the Lake District stimulated the imagination of Romantic poet William Wordsworth in the 19th century. England’s largest national park offers an abundance of outdoor tours: Cruise on Lake Windermere, visit the birthplace of legendary English author Beatrix Potter, or hike to the craggy summits of Scafell Pike Mountain and Skiddaw. In the historic villages that pepper the park’s perimeter, literary museums and English pubs abound. Near the market town of Keswick, the Castlerigg Stone Circle emanates mystery and dates back to 3,000 BC. And the quaint villages of Grasmere and Ambleside are perfect places to roam aimlessly. Travelers short on time can cover 10 of the Lake District National Park’s lakes in one day on a sightseeing tour, while visitors enjoying longer stays can opt for multi-day packages that also cover the Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway, Wrynose Pass, and Hardknott Roman Fort. Don’t be deceived by the Lake District’s tranquil atmosphere: Thrill seekers can get their adrenaline fix during Ghyll Scrambling, which involves sliding and jumping your way down a fast-flowing river. The close proximity of the UNESCO-listed Hadrian’s Wall and Vindola serve to broaden the knowledge of history buffs. After inhaling lungfuls of Lakeland’s unspoiled air, you’re bound to feel renewed and connected to England’s natural landscapes.

Top 10 attractions in Lake District

#1
Ullswater

Ullswater

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With an area of 3.5 square miles (9 square kilometers), Ullswater is England’s second largest lake and one of its most beautiful, thanks to its zigzag shape and stunning setting. The area surrounding the lake is also famous for inspiring Wordsworth’s poem “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” sometimes also called “Daffodils.”More
#2
Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle

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There are numerous neolithic stone circles in the Lake District and nearby areas, the most popular being at Castlerigg. This more-or-less round grouping of 38 boulders, with a rectangle of 10 more joining the inner edge of the circle, dates back some 5000 years, making it even older than Stonehenge. And like Stonehenge, the arrangement of Castlerigg Stone Circle is clearly linked to movements of the sun and moon, although the original ceremonial purpose of the stones is lost in time.The stones themselves are impressive; add the majestic backdrop of Skiddaw, Blencathra and other mountains and you can see why this site has drawn admirers for millennia. An ideal spot to contemplate the mysteries of the past amidst the serenity of nature.More
#3
Bassenthwaite Lake

Bassenthwaite Lake

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One of the Lake District’s largest lakes at 6.4 km in length, Bassenthwaite Lake is best known for its abundant native wildlife, now preserved as part of the region’s only wetland nature reserve. Osprey, Grasshopper Warbler, Curlew, Greylag and Meadow Pipit are among the bird species that frequent the wetlands, while the lake is also one of two places in England to see the rare vendace fish.As well as wildlife watching, Bassenthwaite Lake is a popular spot for sailing, canoeing and fishing (for which a license is required) and the surrounding valley has ample opportunities for hiking, including the popular peaks of Skiddaw, the Lord's Seat and Ullock Pike, all of which offer spectacular views over the lake.More
#4
Beatrix Potter’s Hill Top House

Beatrix Potter’s Hill Top House

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Children’s author Beatrix Potter lived in the 17th-century Hill Top farmhouse for most of her life, and bequeathed it to the National Trust on the condition that it was left “as if I had just gone out and they had just missed me.” The farm was a huge source of inspiration for Potter, who based many of her much-loved books here.More
#5
Rydal Water

Rydal Water

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Despite its diminutive size at just over 1 km long, Rydal Water’s strong literary connections have cemented its status as one of the Lake District’s most visited spots. Wordsworth’s Seat, overlooking the western bank, was renowned as the poet’s favorite viewpoint, while nearby points of interest include Nab Cottage, once home to Thomas Quincey and three of Wordworth’s former homes – White Moss House, Rydal Mount and Dove Cottage.One of the few boat-free lakes, Rydal Water makes a perfect spot for open-air swimming during the warmer months, while the lakeside hills are at their most beautiful in spring and autumn, when fields of wildflowers and colorful foliage add a rich range of hues.More
#6
Buttermere Valley

Buttermere Valley

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With its three lakes framed by a seemingly expanse of rolling hills and craggy peaks, Buttermere Valley is one of the Lake District’s most striking landscapes, and it’s been a popular spot for walkers and nature enthusiasts since the 18th century.The tranquil Buttermere village makes the obvious basecamp, but most visitors come to hike the scenic lakeside trails or scale the surrounding peaks, which include the 851-meter Grasmoor and 806-meter High Stile, as well as Scale Force, England’s highest waterfall. Honister Pass is the main road running through the valley and during the summer months, swimming and rowing are popular activities on the lakes.More
#7
Tarn Hows

Tarn Hows

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One of the most-popular tourist attractions in the Lake District, “the Tarns,” as the locals call it, is a picturesque area visited by over half a million tourists per year since the 1970s. Rightfully so: not only is this an area of outstanding beauty, but it’s also yet another gem bequeathed to the National Trust by Lake District aficionado Beatrix Potter.A tarn is a mountain lake that was formed in a cirque excavated by a glacier, which is later filled with rain or river water. Despite being an icon of the Lake District, Tarn Hows is not typical of the region in terms of landscapes; surrounded by thick conifer woodlands, the actual tarn is partly artificial, having been created by James Garth Marshall in the 1850s. It consists of three distinct tarns, which merged in the 19th century.Located in the low-level valley nestled between the villages of Coniston and Hawkshead, Tarn Hows is now just more than half a mile long (just under 1 km) and 820 feet (250 meters) wide, and contains five islands. It is fed at its northern end by numerous valleys and basin mires and drained by several waterfalls that cascade down the Glen Mary Bridge.Hikers and trekkers will enjoy the accessible 1.5-mile (2.4-km) path that circles the tarn, while fauna enthusiasts will appreciate the heavy presence of Galloway cattle and Herdwick sheep.More
#8
Wray Castle

Wray Castle

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With its battlements, turrets, and arrow-slit windows, the neo-gothic Wray Castle is straight from a storybook. Originally built in 1840 for a Liverpudlian doctor and his heiress wife, the estate once served as a vacation home for the family of children’s author Beatrix Potter and is currently owned by the National Trust.More
#9
Derwentwater

Derwentwater

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Affectionately nicknamed “Queen of the Lakes,” Derwentwater is a quintessential Lakeland spot. With the Cat Bells fell to the west, Friars Crag promontory to the east, and Borrowdale valley to the south, the lake offers a variety of stunning vistas, while its marinas, islands, and hiking trails provide plenty of activities for visitors.More
#10
Grasmere

Grasmere

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Famously described by Wordsworth as ‘the loveliest spot that man hath ever found’, Grasmere has high credentials and the powder-blue lake, bordered by emerald green hillsides and lush woodlands, is certainly among the most attractive in the Lake District.Grasmere’s fame means it’s also one of the National Park’s top destinations and huge crowds flock here during the summer months to walk around the lakeside, paddle around the lake on a rowing boat or kayak, or explore the eponymous village, renowned for its handmade chocolates and gingerbread. Grasmere is also a popular stop for literary fans, with top attractions including the Wordsworth family graves and Dove Cottage and Rydal Mount, both former homes of Wordsworth and preserved as museums.More

Trip ideas

Top Literary Sites in the Lake District

Top Literary Sites in the Lake District

How to Spend 3 Days in the Lake District

How to Spend 3 Days in the Lake District

How to Spend 1 Day in Windermere

How to Spend 1 Day in Windermere

Top activities in Lake District

4 hour Private Lake District tour (Tour B)

4 hour Private Lake District tour (Tour B)

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From
US$298.07
per group
 4 hour Private Lake District tour (Tour A)

4 hour Private Lake District tour (Tour A)

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From
US$298.07
per group
Rock Climbing in Keswick

Rock Climbing in Keswick

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From
US$88.00
Forests & Wildlife - Full Day - Up to 8 People
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Ten Lakes Tour - Full Day - Up to 8 People
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Beatrix Potter: Morning Half Day All-Inclusive Tour with an Expert Guide
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Stunning Lake District 4 Hour Tours!

Stunning Lake District 4 Hour Tours!

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From
US$454.20
per group
8 Lakes and Magnificent Scenery - Afternoon Half Day Tour
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Forests & Wildlife - Full Day - Up to 4 People
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Kayak on Derwent Water

Kayak on Derwent Water

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From
US$88.00
Beatrix Potter: Afternoon Half Day All-Inclusive Tour with an Expert Guide
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Beatrix Potter - Half Day - Up to 4 People
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Frequently Asked Questions