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Things to Do & Must-See Attractions in Canary Islands

Tropical in appearance yet Mediterranean in character, the Canary Islands attract visitors from all over the world to lounge on black- and white-sand Atlantic beaches, seek out adventure in world-class national parks, and enjoy an array of leisure activities from aerial-tram riding to scuba diving. Needless to say, these islands pack a vacation punch much larger than their size might betray, and the wide range of activities on offer combined with the seven airports and plentiful boat transfers account for the Canary Islands’ popularity among travelers of all types. The largest of the islands are Tenerife, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, and Lanzarote, and most visitors choose to base themselves out of one of these while island-hopping to see their neighbors’ main draws. Pair whale-watching with Mt. Teide excursions in Tenerife, beach lounging with catamaran sailing in Fuerteventura, cultural walking tours with camel riding in Gran Canaria, and wine tasting with trips to the volcanic Timanfaya National Park in Lanzarote. Although the climate remains warm and welcoming year-round, visit during the Carnival of Santa Cruz de Tenerife in February to see parades that easily rival the splendor of Rio’s and put the islands’ hybridized Spanish, African, and South American culture on full display.
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Papagayo Beach (Playa de Papagayo)
12 Tours and Activities

One of a string of sandy beaches and bays lining Lanzarote’s southern coast, Papagayo Beach (Playa de Papagayo) lies within the Monumento Natural de Los Ajaches Natural Park and is largely regarded as one of the island’s most beautiful beaches. A horseshoe-shaped bay cocooned between sea cliffs and blessed with swaths of pale gold sand, Papagayo is a top choice for swimming, snorkeling and water sports.

A visit to Papagayo Beach is easily combined with exploring the five neighboring beaches - Playa de Afe, Playa de Mujeres, Playa Pozo, Playa de Afe,] and Playa de la Cera – often collectively referred to as the ‘Papagayo beaches’. The beaches are linked by a coastal walk, which runs all the way from Punta Papagayo to Playa Blanca, and are famous for their fine sands, warm, clear waters and abundance of exotic fish.

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Timanfaya National Park (Parque Nacional de Timanfaya)
28 Tours and Activities

With its still-steaming mounds of volcanic tuff and eerily barren lava fields, the volcanic terrain of Timanfaya National Park is a world away from the lively beach towns that Lanzarote is best known for. The focal point of the protected area is the dramatic red and black-rock mountain range, aptly named the Fire Mountains (Montañas de Fuego) after a series of eruptions in the 18th century that covered the entire island with volcanic ash and lava, completely reshaping the its topography.

Today, the volcanoes lie dormant, but the area remains a potent source of geothermal energy thanks to a residual magma chamber – a fact enthusiastically demonstrated by tour guides who toss bundles of branches into the steaming pits, where the wood rapidly burst into flames. Access to Timanfaya National Park is restricted to guided tours, and most visitors to the park opt to take the guided coach tours included in the admission price.

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Los Hervideros
16 Tours and Activities

An extraordinary collage of rocks, caves and lava tubes looming over Lanzarote’s west coast, the coastal cliffs of Los Hervideros rank among the island’s most unusual geological attractions. Formed during the 18th-century eruptions of the Timanfaya volcanoes, the dramatic coastline is now adorned with sharp rock columns, oddly shaped archways and natural rock sculptures, created as the hot lava met with the icy waves.

While the unique landscape makes for some remarkable photo opportunities, the real highlight of visiting Los Hervideros is watching the waves crash against the coast. Looking out from the cliff top, visitors can witness the all-natural spectacle as the waves explode against the rocks and the water funnels through the spillways, sending spurts of sea water roaring into the air – a fitting example of how the cliffs got their name - Los Hervideros is Spanish for "boiling waters."

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Teide National Park (Parque Nacional del Teide)
93 Tours and Activities

The largest and oldest National Park in the Canary Islands and home to Spain’s highest peak, Mount Teide, the UNESCO World Heritage listed Teide National Park is one of the top attractions on the island of Tenerife. At 3,718m, the landmark peak of Teide - the world’s third highest volcano from its base - is omnipresent and taking the cable car to the top is one of the most popular pastimes for visitors, with views spanning the surrounding islands.

Even from ground level, the park’s rugged landscape is magnificent, a geological wonder featuring an expanse of rugged lava fields, ancient calderas and volcanic peaks. Spread over 18,900 hectares, additional highlights of the park include the 3,135m Pico Viejo volcano, the distinctive Roques de García rock formations, and a unique array of native flora and fauna, including rare insects like the Tenerife lizard and an impressive collection of birds, including Egyptian vultures, sparrowhawks and red kite.

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Masca Valley
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36 Tours and Activities

With its steep rocky cliffs, forested trails and trickling waterfalls, the wild landscape of the Masca Valley is among Tenerife’s most beautiful, and the remote gorge offers a thrilling backdrop for a hiking expedition.

At the top of the valley, the aptly nicknamed ‘lost village’ of Masca is perched precariously on the 600-meter-high edge of the gorge, reachable by a hair-raisingly steep serpentine road and offering spectacular views over the valley. From the village, it’s possible to hike all the way to the coast, a dramatic 4.5km trail that scrambles over the valley floor, past hidden caves, lagoons and black sand beaches.

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Mt. Teide (El Teide)
27 Tours and Activities

Towering 3,718 m over the island of Tenerife, scaling the high-altitude peak of Spain’s highest mountain can be, quite literally, breathtaking. Thankfully, you don’t have to climb the summit to take in the views from Mount Teide – the Teide Cable Car whisks visitors to an observation deck at 3,550m, where you can enjoy dramatic views that span as far as the neighboring Canary Islands on clear days. It’s also possible to hike to the lookout point, a taxing climb that takes around 5 hours, but to scale the final 200m to the highest point, climbers need to secure a free permit from the National Park office.

Set in an ancient caldera at the center of the UNESCO World Heritage listed Teide National Park, the Mount Teide volcano dates back around 1 million years and ranks as the 3rd highest volcano in the world, rising 7,500 m above the ocean floor. Although the volcano hasn’t erupted since 1909, it remains active and seismic activity was recorded as recently as 2003.

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César Manrique Foundation (Fundación César Manrique)
10 Tours and Activities

Art and architecture meet nature at the César Manrique Foundation. Situated in Manrique’s former home, the foundation melds into a landscape of lava rock and provides a visually stunning glimpse into the Lanzarote native’s craft.

Manrique, an artist and architect, left an indelible mark on the island, and not just through his creations—he even impacted the Lanzarote skyline. Indeed, thanks to his efforts, he helped to ensure that growing tourism didn’t result in growing skyscrapers. It’s a mission that continues to this day via the foundation, which aims to not only preserve Manrique’s work, but to also advance the environmental and artistic causes he valued.

The house itself sits on the aftermath of an 18th-century volcanic eruption that vastly changed the Lanzarote terrain. But it isn’t just built on the frozen-in-time lava, but among it, with the bottom living space occupying five volcanic bubbles.

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Majanicho 
5 Tours and Activities

When it comes to remoteness and volcanic landscapes, the Canary Islands are good at making you feel like you’re a world away. And the barely-a-village, bayside Majanicho only adds to that magic. It will have you feeling like you’re on an expedition on the face of the moon – albeit one that includes surf-worthy beaches and an ocean.

Located along the northern coast of Fuerteventura, Majanicho is—at least for now—less a village than it is a collection of somewhat ramshackle houses cuddled up around the watery finger of a bay. Don’t expect to find restaurants or shops here, and rather just a rocky coast, and crystal-blue waters filled with the occasional dinghy used for fishing. And then, of course, there are the surfers -- from windsurfers to kiteboarders and just regular old surfers – who know that these secluded waters offer up some great opportunities to catch either waves or wind.

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Famara Beach (Playa de Famara)
2 Tours and Activities

A 1.8-mile-long stretch of golden sand fringed by soaring sea cliffs, the picturesque setting of Famara Beach (Playa de Famara) has earned it a legion of fans, among them renowned local artist César Manrique and Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar. The dramatic surroundings make the beach extremely popular among locals, and there are ample opportunities for exploring, like walking in the sand dunes, hiking across the cliff tops of El Risco (Lanzarote’s highest peak) or tucking into fresh seafood in the traditional fishing village of Caleta de Famara.

Benefiting from consistent winds and world-class reef breaks, the beach is also a hot spot for water sports, with popular activities including surfing, windsurfing and kiteboarding, as well as hang-gliding from the coastal cliffs.

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More Things to Do in Canary Islands

Aquapark Costa Teguise

Aquapark Costa Teguise

2 Tours and Activities
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La Caldera

La Caldera

1 Tour and Activity

Pine trees, volcanic geography, and views upon views are what you’ll find when exploring Tenerife’s La Caldera and the region that surrounds it. A volcanic crater, La Caldera is situated in La Orotava Valley, which spans the northern part of the island’s central coast. La Orotava is packed with more than just pretty scenery but also trails, including those around La Caldera and its recreation area.

Easily accessible, the La Caldera crater is where you’ll find picnic tables and a playground, along with other facilities, including a restaurant. But it’s the woodland wonderland that surrounds all of this that you may be more keen to explore, particularly the loop that circles the crater and ventures off into the mountainous landscape beyond. The roughly 3-hour excursion, which begins from the recreation area, passes through the region’s mossy, fern-filled terrain, and offers impressive views of Tenerife, including El Teide.

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LagOmar

LagOmar

Get a taste of Lanzarote in more ways than one at LagOmar, where its museum, restaurant, bar and cottages are all wrapped into one magical lava-rock landscape. Once a private home, the structure was built into a volcanic quarry, lending to an oasis-like setting filled with caves, spectacular island views and unique gardens and architecture.

The private property was conceived by local artist and architect César Manrique, designed by José Soto and later completed by other architects. Perhaps more famous than LagOmar’s creators is the story of its once owner, actor Omar Sharif, who came to the island to film a movie, fell in love with the property and purchased it. But alas, rumor has it that he owned it for only one day before losing it in a bet over a bridge game. Whatever the history, today’s property can be visited and enjoyed in a variety of ways. Go there to check out its museum, where you can learn more about LagOmar and also view revolving art exhibitions.

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Lobos Island

Lobos Island

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17 Tours and Activities

Fuerteventura might seem like enough of an island paradise, but it isn’t the only one that you’ll want to be conquering in this part of the Canaries: just 2 kilometers off shore sits a tiny islet that is a worthy destination unto itself. Called Lobos Island, the volcanic land mass spans 1.8 square miles and gets its name from the large population of monk seals (also called sea wolves) that used to live here.

Although the island’s formation dates back to thousands of years ago, 1405 marks the first recorded presence of man, when Jean de Béthencourt used it as a resupply station during his conquest of Fuerteventura. Since those times, it has remained virtually uninhabited, with a lighthouse keeper having lived there until 1968, after which the illuminated beacon became automated. Today, and since 1982, Lobos Island has been classified as a nature reserve, noted for its abundance of vegetation species (over 130 different kinds), and its bird population.

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Roque Nublo

Roque Nublo

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10 Tours and Activities
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Siam Park

Siam Park

1 Tour and Activity

With everything from high-speed water slides to hair-raising amusement rides, there’s every opportunity to get your adrenaline pumping at Siam Park, and as long as you’re happy to get wet, Europe’s biggest water park is sure to be a hit. Opening its doors in 2007, the Thai-themed park was designed by Christoph Kiessling and features a Thai floating market and Thai restaurants. Even just strolling through the park is an experience, with exotic architecture, streams filled with tropical fish and a huge white-sand beach, dotted with plenty of family-safe swimming areas and relaxing Jacuzzi baths.

Thrillseekers will likely make a beeline for the legendary Tower of Power – a vertical transparent slide that plummets riders through a pool of sharks and stingrays, or The Dragon, a gravity-defying Proslide Tornado, but less-confident swimmers might prefer to tackle the Jungle Snake slides or take a rafting trip along the Mekong Rapids.

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Santiago del Teide

Santiago del Teide

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5 Tours and Activities
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El Golfo

El Golfo

10 Tours and Activities

Far removed from the golden sands and azure waters of Lanzarote’s principal beach resorts, the coastal landscape of El Golfo harbors one of the island’s most unique geological areas. A rare example of an ancient hydro-volcano, a combination of volcanic eruptions and sea erosions have imprinted the shore with a half-moon shaped crater lake, Lago Verde (Green Lake), separated from the sea by a stretch of black sand.

Looking down over the beach from the surrounding cliff tops is the best way to view the site, an otherworldly landscape famous for its startling contrasts of colors and shapes. The lime-green waters of the crater lake (the result of the Ruppia Maritima algae that lives in the waters) appear almost luminous against the black sand beach, itself a peculiar blend of black volcanic sand and green Olivine stones, and the small bay is framed by a rugged chain of eroded volcanic rocks.

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El Cotillo

El Cotillo

8 Tours and Activities

Though tourism has made its mark on many of Fuerteventura’s beaches and fishing towns, there are a few that have yet to fully feel its effects – and El Cotillo is no doubt one of them. While it’s only a matter of time before it becomes a destination for the masses, for now it remains a sweet former fishing village with idyllic shores ideal for all water lovers.  Located on the northwestern side of the island, El Cotillo has a laidback village vibe that’s hardly fancy, but still exudes a certain charm nonetheless. The town sidles up against the ocean, where you’ll find a rippled coastline complete with a selection of different kinds of beaches. Family’s can park themselves in the sand to the north along La Concha, which is protected on both sides, ensuring calm waters. On the other hand, those in search of both wind and waves will want to travel south to the long stretch of beach situated just beyond town.

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Playa del Janubio

Playa del Janubio

3 Tours and Activities

You can smell the salty air as the edges of white waves crash into the black sands of Playa del Janubio. Beside the beautiful beach, historic salt ponds sit that have been used to collect and extract salt from the seawater for centuries. Water evaporates in the shallow lagoons, leaving the salt behind. In the days before refrigeration, salt was even more prized for its food preservation qualities. Remnants of the old salt production and trade here, including a small windmill, remind of the area’s past.

Today the beach, formed by the breakdown of black volcanic rock, is still a lovely place to stroll by the sea. Depending on the season you may see a variety of local birds as well. Currents are often quite strong on the beach, and the powerful waves are beautiful to watch from the shore.

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Los Roques de García

Los Roques de García

22 Tours and Activities

A cluster of uniquely shaped rocks lying in the shadows of the notoriously volatile Teide volcano, Los Roques de García are among the top attractions of Tenerife’s UNESCO-listed Teide National Park. Formed by years of ancient volcanic activity, the pyroclastic rocks are best known for their impressive stature and peculiar shapes, some appearing to defy gravity and others taking on an otherworldly presence.

The most famous rocks include the ‘Roque Cinchado’, known as ‘God’s Finger’, now one of Tenerife’s most iconic landmarks, and the imposing La Catedral, the tallest at 200-meters high and a popular challenge for climbers. Each rock has its own unique moniker, including ‘El Queso’, ‘Roques Blancos’ and ‘Torrotito’, and the best way to enjoy the views is hiking the circular trail around the valley, which takes around 2 hours.

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