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Changi Murals
Changi Murals

Changi Murals

Singapore, 506969

The Basics

Warren painted the five Changi Murals, named Nativity, Ascension, Crucifixion, Last Supper, and St. Luke in Prison, to help lift the moods of ill prisoners, as Warren himself suffered from renal disorder and dysentery while interred. Besides the murals, the Changi Museum and Chapel also houses many artifacts, photographs and letters that speak of the conditions suffered by Allied POWs in the Japanese-run internment camps. The original murals still exist, but access to the chapel is restricted, as it’s now a part of the Ministry of Defence Changi Airbase Camp.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Admission to the Changi Museum is free, making it an excellent option for budget travelers.
  • The Changi Museum offers War Trail tours on Wednesdays and Saturdays and an audio guide in English.
  • The museum is fully wheelchair accessible, and a wheelchair is available to borrow upon request.
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How to Get There

The best way to get to the Changi Museum and Chapel where the replica murals are on display is to take the MRT to Tanah Merah MRT Station and catch SBS Bus 2 to the Changi Museum stop.

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Trip ideas

Virtual Cooking Classes With a Singapore Guide

Virtual Cooking Classes With a Singapore Guide


When to Get There

Plan to visit the Changi Museum and Chapel early in the day during a visit to the seaside village to gain some historical context for the other attractions. The museum is open daily throughout the year.

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Wildcard

The Restoration of the Changi Murals After the war ended, the murals were distempered over and forgotten, until their rediscovery in 1958. After a year of searching, Warren was discovered to be the original artist, and he was persuaded to assist in restoring the murals that had faded over time. He returned to Singapore three times in the 1960s and was able to fully restore four of the five murals before his advanced age prevented him from continuing.

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