Recent Searches
Clear
Things to do in Tasmania

Things to do in  Tasmania

Welcome to Tasmania

Good food, great wine, and more than three million acres of UNESCO World Heritage–listed wilderness beckon travelers to Tasmania. While Port Arthur's 19th-century penitentiary ruins evoke an eerie sense of Tasmania's convict past, those who visit the island today have a great amount of freedom, especially when it comes to planning an itinerary—or choosing from numerous tours that expertly explore the Island of Inspiration. Want to experience the island's natural beauty? Hike up or bike down Mount Wellington, the landmark of capital Hobart; cruise past ancient rain forests on the Gordon River from Strahan; or day trip to Freycinet Peninsula National Park, home to Wineglass Bay's white-sand beaches and pristine waters. If you're feeling cultural, head to the Hobart waterfront for a taste of its up-and-coming culinary and craft-beer scenes; visit the Salamanca Place weekend market; spy cute colonial buildings along Battery Point; or admire Aboriginal artwork at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. No matter your home base, opportunities for day tours abound—bushwalk through the unspoiled wilderness of Cradle Mountain from Launceston or Devonport; head offshore to wild Bruny Island from Hobart for surf, sun, and the chance to spot wallabies, penguins, and migrating whales; or head to the Tasman Peninsula to witness the Tasmanian Devil Unzoo's namesake critters, kangaroos, and native birds.

Top 10 attractions in Tasmania

#1
Freycinet National Park

Freycinet National Park

star-5322
One of Tasmania’s most popular coastal holiday spots, Freycinet National Park is backed by the pink-tinged granite outcrops known as the Hazards.Low-lying coastal heathland frames views of blue sea and sand throughout the park, with the Hazards looming large in the distance. Bushwalkers head here to follow coastal trails along the peninsula’s secluded coves, and the park is a popular holiday camping spot for families.The park’s white-sand beaches are beautiful but top marks always go to perfectly formed Wineglass Bay, which often appears in travel top 10s as one of the world’s most gorgeous beaches. It really does have a circular wineglass shape, fringed by white sand and untouched bushland.Birdwatchers come to Freycinet to spot seabirds, and you might see cockatoos, wattlebirds and wallabies on the two-hour return walk to the lofty lookout over Wineglass Bay. It’s an often steep incline with steps, or you can follow the wheelchair-friendly boardwalk at Cape Tourville for less-exhausting but still stunning views of the bay.Boating and fishing are other popular activities, along with rock climbing, sea-kayaking, swimming at the Friendly Beaches and snorkeling at Sleepy Bay and Honeymoon Bay.More
#2
Tamar Valley

Tamar Valley

star-5448
The Tamar Valley is right on Launceston’s doorstep, stretching north to the sea at George Town. It’s a lush, fertile area of orchards, pasture, B&Bs and, importantly, vineyards.If you’re driving or taking a tour from Launceston, follow the Tamar Valley Wine Route winding through the valley to visit notable wineries like Pipers Brook, Clover Hill, Delamere, Bass and Ninth Island. The area is particularly renowned for its Pinot Noir wines.The route heads north from Launceston, running along the western side of the valley through Exeter, Rosevears and Beaconsfield. The valley is crossed by the strikingly cable-trussed Batman Bridge at Deviot, then runs north to George Town on the valley’s eastern bank. Returning to Launceston, the route loops south through Lilydale and Rocherlea.Wines to sample along the route include Riesling, Chardonnay and, most notably, Pinot Noir. Cellar door restaurants are another highlight, and you’ll also pass the Tamar Island Wetlands, mining history at Beaconsfield, and the Georgian-era sailing port of George Town.Other towns to visit include riverside Rosevears, Beauty Point, where you’ll find Seahorse World, and Low Head with its maritime history museum and pilot station, lighthouse and penguin tours near George Town.More
#3
Port Arthur

Port Arthur

star-5933
A moving reminder of Australia’s harrowing history, the former convict settlement of Port Arthur was a key part of often brutal convict discipline within the colonial system. Today, the Port Arthur historic site is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Tasmania’s most visited tourist attraction, with museums and memorials devoted to telling the area’s history.More
#4
Devils at Cradle Wildlife Park

Devils at Cradle Wildlife Park

star-565
Devils @ Cradle is a wildlife sanctuary dedicated to the preservation of Tasmanian devils (though they also have a large number of quolls and other local creatures). See Tasmanian devils up close and personal, and learn about these mysterious marsupials and the current threats to their survival with ranger-led talks and tours.More
#5
Cataract Gorge Reserve

Cataract Gorge Reserve

star-5277
The magnificent Cataract Gorge, a river gorge on the South Esk River right at the edge of Launceston, offers a wealth of outdoor recreation that feels a world away from the city. The reserve is home to the First Basin outdoor swimming pool, the world’s longest single-span chairlift, and a Victorian-era landscaped garden.More
#6
Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

star-5286
With its jagged dolerite peaks standing watch over a trio of glacial lakes, Cradle Mountain is the grand centerpiece of the Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park. Part of the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Tasmania Wilderness, the natural landmark also marks the north end of the famous Overland Track.More
#7
Mt. Wellington (Kunanyi)

Mt. Wellington (Kunanyi)

star-5880
Standing sentinel over Hobart, Mt. Wellington is also known as Kunanyi or simply “the Mountain.” The 4,170-foot (1,271-meter) peak offers unbeatable views over the Tasmanian capital, and the surrounding parklands serve as a popular recreational ground for city dwellers.More
#8
Cape Bruny Lighthouse

Cape Bruny Lighthouse

star-51,450
Situated on Bruny Island in Tasmania, the Cape Bruny Lighthouse is the second-oldest lighthouse tower in the country, having been first lit in 1838. The structure was commissioned by Governor George Arthur following a series of mishaps and shipwrecks just off Bruny Island and took two years to build by convict labor.Technological advances in the 1980s and 1990s led to the lighthouse being lit for the last time on Aug. 6, 1996, when it was replaced by a solar-powered light nearby. In December 2000, the lighthouse was declared part of the South Bruny National Park.Visitors should be prepared for rough roads and a steep walk to reach the lighthouse, although you’ll be well rewarded on arrival; with some fantastic views out to sea, migrating humpback and southern right whales have been spotted from this vantage point.More
#9
Sarah Island

Sarah Island

star-5870
Modern Australia was famously founded by boatloads of British convicts, and Sarah Island off of western Tasmania was once reserved for the worst offenders. Isolated, wet and completely surrounded by the tempestuous Southern Ocean, not only is it Australia’s oldest penal colony, but the remote outpost was such a fearsome place to be sent that the mouth of the harbor leading out toward the island was simply known as “Hell’s Gate.” The penal colony was short-lived, however, only lasting from 1822 to 1833. During that time, convicts were enlisted for the backbreaking work of felling the surrounding pine trees, and there was a brief time when Sarah Island was the largest ship-building site in Australia.Conditions on the island were horrendously bad, and prisoners were said to have favored execution over continued life here. Many tried to escape, and though most failed and met a miserable fate, a famous few were able to flee and live a life on the run. Today, all that remains of the penal colony are the ruins of the former quarters, and touring the island is one of the most popular activities for visitors staying in Strahan. Hear stories of scurvy, torture and the misery of solitary confinement, while also gaining insight into the formative years of the pioneering settlers of Tasmania. Oftentimes a visit to Sarah Island is combined with a Gordon River cruise, which provides a scenic and stark contrast of comforts compared to the historic island.More
#10
Cascade Brewery

Cascade Brewery

star-5284
With a legacy dating back to 1824, Cascade Brewery is Australia’s oldest continually operating brewery, founded by English settler Peter Degraves. The historic brewery, set in Hobart at the foot of Mount Wellington, welcomes guests to its brewhouse and restaurant, and offers tours and tastings.More

Top activities in Tasmania

Port Arthur Tour from Hobart

Port Arthur Tour from Hobart

star-4.5
296
From
US$ 104.28
Wineglass Bay Cruise from Coles Bay

Wineglass Bay Cruise from Coles Bay

star-4.5
689
From
US$ 110.37
Tamar Valley Wine Tour With Lunch

Special Offer

Tamar Valley Wine Tour With Lunch

star-5
363
From
US$ 106.61
US$ 113.42  US$ 6.81 savings
Hobart Hop-on Hop-off Bus Tour

Hobart Hop-on Hop-off Bus Tour

star-4.5
156
From
US$ 26.64
Signature Tour

Signature Tour

star-5
35
From
US$ 151.48
Three Capes Panorama

Three Capes Panorama

star-5
7
From
US$ 452.91

Frequently Asked Questions