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Things to do in  Dublin

Welcome to Dublin

Dublin—the vibrant capital of the Emerald Isle—buzzes with life. Thanks to its many attractions, museums, and historical monuments, you’ll find plenty of adventure on its cobblestone streets. Follow in the footsteps of authors such as James Joyce and W.B. Yeats, get a taste for Ireland’s most famous export at the Guinness Storehouse, or take the kids to the Dublin Zoo. Daily tours run from the capital to attractions including the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Giant’s Causeway, and the Wicklow Mountains National Park, where you’ll see the soaring cliffs and the open wilderness of the coast and countryside.

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Top 10 attractions in Dublin

Molly Malone Statue
#1

Molly Malone Statue

The bronze statue of Molly Malone commemorates the young woman featured in the local ballad, 'Cockles and Mussels'. As the song goes, this beautiful woman plied her trade as a fishmonger through the streets where her statue now rests, until she suddenly died of a fever. As a nod to the folk song, a statue was erected on the corner of Grafton and Suffolk streets and unveiled at the 1988 Dublin Millennium celebrations. This tune has been adopted as Dublin's unofficial anthem, boosting this heroine to eternal fame. Though there is debate as to whether or not a Molly Malone like the one in the song ever existed, she is real to the people of Dublin and is remembered both in song as well as on June 13, National Molly Malone Day. The statue also acts as a popular rendezvous spot for groups as the beautiful bosomy woman with her cart cannot be missed....
Guinness Storehouse
#2

Guinness Storehouse

Ireland's top attraction is the Guinness Storehouse. People from all corners of the world come to visit the birthplace of the black frothy brew and get a taste straight from the barrel. In November 2000, the Guinness Storehouse opened its doors as a multi-media visitor experience. Thousands of visitors each year enter the pint glass-shaped tower and make their way up through seven stories of interactive exhibits demonstrating the brewing process as well as the history behind this legendary stout. A treat for the senses, the self-guided tour allows guests to look at old ads, touch the barley, smell the hops, hear the waterfall and finally, to taste the finished product. On the top floor, visitors line up to claim their complimentary pint of Guinness, complete with shamrock flourish, to enjoy in the Gravity Bar. The completely glass-enclosed level provides 360 degree views over the brewery and city....
Jameson Distillery Bow St.
#3

Jameson Distillery Bow St.

The Old Jameson Distillery, tucked away in a quaint cobbled alley that opens into a small courtyard, has managed to maintain the charm of its heyday in the early 1800s. Though most of the operation has since moved to Cork, Ireland, the old distillery is one of Dublin's top attractions and a must-see for whiskey fans as well as those curious about this Irish landmark. Tours run daily and cover the history of John Jameson and the family business he created in addition to the whiskey making process. After learning about malting, milling, mashing, fermenting, distilling and maturing, visitors are invited to take part in the final step--tasting! For those who feel that the tour sample has not quenched their thirst, they have the option to pull up a stool at the Jameson Bar or take their next drink with a meal at The 3rd Still restaurant. On the way out, a stop at the gift shop is a must to pick up souvenir bottles, glasses and everything else....
Trinity College Dublin
#4

Trinity College Dublin

Supremely located in the heart of Dublin, Trinity College stands as the gem of Ireland. Ranked as the number one university in the nation and in the top forty globally, Trinity College has a stellar academic reputation in addition to being one of Dublin's finest landmarks. Established in 1592, the college has been at its current location since the 1700s and boasts some beautiful Georgian architecture from that time. The Campanile and Examination Hall are commonly the subjects of photographs. The Old Library is popular amongst visitors as well, but it is not the look of the building's exterior that draws them there. Held within the Old Library is the world famous Book of Kells, an ancient sacred text, which is on display in a special exhibit. While Trinity College is deeply rooted in its history, much has changed since the institution first opened its doors over 400 years ago. Founded by Queen Elizabeth I of England, the college was originally only open to Protestant men....
Temple Bar
#5

Temple Bar

Temple Bar is known as the cultural quarter of Dublin. Originally a slum that was to be developed into a bus terminus, it became home to a number of artists' galleries and small businessmen's shops who took advantage of the cheap rent in the 1980s. Presently, the Irish Film Institute and the Temple Bar Music Centre are amongst the several cultural institutions tucked away in this district's narrow cobbled streets. Since the success of the movement to preserve Temple Bar, several drinking establishments have also popped up in the neighborhood. Though family-friendly during the day, what happens here after dark wouldn't be considered "culturally rich experiences" by most. As far as nightlife goes, Temple Bar is a popular place to get a drink or two (or three!) with friends, enjoy some traditional Irish music and observe the rowdy antics from a distance....
The Book of Kells
#6

The Book of Kells

Known as one of Ireland's national treasures, the Book of Kells is a sacred and important historical text dating from around 800 A.D., making it one of the oldest books in the world. The book gets its name from the Abbey of Kells, which was its original home until the continuous plundering of the Vikings proved to be too great of a threat. Since the 15th century it has been at Trinity College for safekeeping. The Book of Kells is an illuminated manuscript created by Celtic monks that depicts the 4 gospels of the New Testament as well as other texts. Written in Latin, the book has been translated and found to have a few mistakes. But these are overlooked as the manuscript was made to serve a more decorative and ceremonial purpose than one of utility. In fact, it is its illuminations (illustrations) that make the Book of Kells so remarkable....
Dublin Phoenix Park
#7

Dublin Phoenix Park

Spanning 1752 acres just north of the River Liffey, Dublin’s Phoenix Park is one of the largest walled city parks in Europe. Established as a royal deer park for King Charles II in 1662, a herd of wild fallow deer have lived in the park grounds ever since. Look out for them in the meadow area known as Fifteen Acres. Phoenix Park is full of tree-lined avenues, woods, and open spaces dotted with wildflowers. The park’s Victorian People's Flower Gardens are a popular visit, and next to The Walled Garden and Ashtown Castle there’s a cafe that serves fresh, organic food. There’s also a Victorian tea room on Phoenix Park’s Chesterfield Avenue. In summer, the park hosts open-air concerts and the Phoenix Park Motor Races every August. A popular spot for a picnic, the park is home to Dublin Zoo which receives over a million visitors a year, and there are bikes available for hire....
Dublin Castle
#8

Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle has served many functions since it was built by King John of England in 1230. At that time, the castle was meant to act as a defense center against the current invaders, the Normans, and serve as the seat of the English government. Since then, Dublin Castle has also been the site of the royal mint, the police headquarters and the residence of various British leaders. Today, the castle grounds are used for some governmental purposes but are mostly only used for ceremonial purposes, such as the Irish President's inauguration, and to host conferences, like those of the European Council. When no such event is occurring, Dublin Castle is open to the public. Guided tours take visitors through the grounds, sharing the history and ever-changing purpose of each building....
St. Stephen's Green
#9

St. Stephen's Green

Opened in 1880 as a grand Georgian park to be enjoyed by the people of Dublin, on sunny summer days St Stephen’s Green gets packed with families and groups of friends relaxing by the lake. A walk around the 22-acre park is like a mini lesson on Irish history’s most celebrated figures. Fittingly for a park that was funded by the Guinness fortune, the grandest statue of all is that of Arthur Guinness. Look out for the bust of James Joyce by the bandstand, and in the northeast corner of the park, see Edward Delaney’s bronze memorial of the Great Famine of 1845-1850. By the central flower display, see the park bench where a modest plaque is dedicated to Dublin’s so-called ‘fallen women’ who were forced to work in the city’s Magdalene laundries. Surrounded by elegant Georgian buildings, St Stephen’s Green wasn’t always so impressive—this was once a dangerous, marshy common that hosted public whippings, burnings and even hangings right up until the 18th century....
Dublin O’Connell Street
#10

Dublin O’Connell Street

Any visitor touring Dublin by foot will eventually walk down O’Connell Street. This bustling street is Dublin’s main thoroughfare, and while it’s only approximately a quarter mile in length, it’s believed to be the widest urban street found anywhere in all Europe. O’Connell Street is also famous for its statues, where the stone likeness of James Joyce watches over the swarm of crowds. It’s also home to the world’s tallest sculpture, and is the site of the O’Connell Monument that still has bullet holes from the 1916 Easter uprising. The General Post Office involved in the uprising is also along the street, although the historical buildings and statues aside, it’s the shopping, restaurants, and pubs that draw most of O’Connell Street’s visitors today. After slowly strolling the length of the street—past the impromptu gatherings of street musicians and shadowy city eccentrics—cross the River Liffey on the O’Connell Bridge to head towards Trinity College....

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