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Welcome to Manaus

The gateway to the Brazilian Amazon is reachable primarily by boat and plane, and the forested landscape has been remarkably well-preserved. Travelers in search of an epic foray into the rain forest inevitably pass through this concrete jungle as a departure point. Manaus mixes cultures from the surrounding native tribes and the rubber boom days long ago. Explore this bustling city on a private or small-group tour with an expert guide to see where the Rio Negro and the Solimões rivers meet at the edge of the city, known as the ‘Meeting of the Waters’ due to the different shades running side-by-side into the Amazon River. Tour Manaus’ highlights by speedboat or land, including the Rio Negro Palace (now a cultural center), the opulent City Hall, open-air markets selling goods harvested from the river and the jungle, and the famous Amazonas Opera House. Most travelers use Manaus as a departure point for adventures in the Amazon rain forest, and a variety of tours suit every budget, schedule, and set of interests. Embark on a day trip to the nearby Presidente Figueiredo waterfalls to explore and swim, or book an all-out survival trek with a guide into the deep rain forest, for a few days or a week. Get ready to fish, paddle, or camp your way through the inimitable rain forest.

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Top 10 attractions in Manaus

Meeting of Waters (Encontro das Aguas)
#1

Meeting of Waters (Encontro das Aguas)

The city of Manaus lies at the confluence of two great rivers, the Solimões and the Black. Although borders on water are typically impossible to see, that is not the case in Manaus. Because of the different colors of the two rivers, it's possible to see precisely where they meet - which is what makes the "Meeting of Waters," or Encontro das Aguas, a checklist must-do for visitors to Manaus. The Black River, or Rio Negro, gets its name from the color of the water. The Solimões River in Manaus is a sandy brownish color. This means you can see exactly where the two rivers come together. Not only that, each river on its own is a different temperature and run at a different speed, so when they come together the water doesn't just mix to create a muddy soup - instead, the rivers essentially run alongside one another....
Ponta Negra Beach (Praia de Ponta Negra)
#2

Ponta Negra Beach (Praia de Ponta Negra)

The city of Manaus lies at the confluence of two major rivers, so although it's quite a distance from the Brazilian coast, it still has a host of beach spots popular with locals and tourists alike. Arguably the most popular of these beach destinations is the Ponta Negra beach (Praia de Ponta Negra)....
Amazon Theatre (Teatro Amazonas)
#3

Amazon Theatre (Teatro Amazonas)

Much of Manaus’ wealth came from the rubber boom, during which it was the region's most-important port city. Manaus Opera House (Amazon Theatre) is a fine example of the Belle Epoque-style architecture that was popular during this epoque; the interior features some 200 Italian chandeliers and furnishings imported from Europe....
Adolpho Lisboa Municipal Market (Mercado Adolpho Lisboa)
#4

Adolpho Lisboa Municipal Market (Mercado Adolpho Lisboa)

The image of the art-nouveau cast-iron Adolpho Lisboa Municipal Market building is like a snapshot of the multiculturalism of Manaus as a whole. The building, inspired by Les Halles in Paris and constructed in 1882 during the Rubber Boom, is distinctly European, but when you step through the doors, there’s no mistaking you’re in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon. As the city’s main market perched on the banks of the Rio Negro, vendors here sell a bit of everything, and for the visiting tourist, it’s a great place to sample exotic fruits, learn about traditional Amazonian medicines or shop for souvenirs, like leather goods and índio handcrafted items....
Rio Negro Palace (Palácio Rio Negro)
#5

Rio Negro Palace (Palácio Rio Negro)

Built in 1903 as the home of wealthy German rubber tycoon Karl Waldemar Scholz and then auctioned off after the decline of the Rubber Boom, the Rio Negro Palace (Palácio Rio Negro) served as the state capital and governor’s residence for many years until it was converted into a cultural center in 1997....
Museu do Índio
#6

Museu do Índio

Learning about the indigenous population of a country like Brazil should be an interesting and engaging part of one's visit. The museum is run by a congregation of Salesian nuns, and it boasts a nice collection of artifacts. Anyone curious about the history of the indigenous tribes of the Amazonas region would likely enjoy spending some time checking out the variety of everyday objects in the Museu do Índio's collection - including pottery, tools, ritual masks and musical instruments. Descriptions are in English, Portuguese and German, and the museum is open varying hours from Monday-Saturday. Admission is R$5....
Manaus Palace of Justice (Palácio de Justiça)
#7

Manaus Palace of Justice (Palácio de Justiça)

Located on the main square in Manaus, the Palace of Justice (Palácio de Justiça) was built during the term of Governor Eduardo Ribeiro, the state governor of Manaus during the golden years of the Rubber Boom in the final years of the nineteenth century. The palace, with its grand architecture inspired by the French Second Empire and Neo-classicism, is a testament to just how wealthy the region was during its heyday. In 1987, the palace was converted into a cultural center. Today, the public can visit the building’s offices and court rooms and learn about the important decisions made there throughout the region’s history. One notably interesting feature of the palace is the statue of Themis, the Greek goddess of law and justice, on the roof. A departure from the typical likeness of Themis, this massive statue shows the goddess with her eyes uncovered and her scale tipped, suggesting that maybe justice isn’t so blind after all....
Indian Museum
#8

Indian Museum

Operated by the Salesian Sisters, an order of nuns with missions in the Upper Amazon region, the Indian Museum (Museu do Índio) displays a collection of weapons, musical instruments, ritual masks, ceramics, tools and ceremonial clothing from the indigenous tribes of the Amazon rainforest, mostly from the states of Amazonas and Pará. Apart from touring the collection to learn more about the region’s tribes, the museum also offers visitors the chance to shop for authentic índio handicrafts, like necklaces and baskets made from natural materials, in the small gift shop....
CIGS Zoo
#9

CIGS Zoo

The CIGS Zoo is run by the Brazilian Army and serves as a safe haven for animals rescued from traffickers and hunters. The site houses a variety of animals that have been rescued (or displaced from their natural habitats due to development), including jaguars, monkeys, tapirs, sloths, and many species of birds and Amazonian fish....

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