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Things to do in Poland

Things to do in  Poland

Welcome to Poland

Poland is a country renowned for reinvention. Warsaw, the country's capital, emerged from the ashes of World War II destruction and transformed into one of Eastern Europe's brightest stars. A sightseeing tour of the city reveals Gothic, communist, and modernist architectural styles, while the Warsaw Rising, History of Polish Jews, and Neon museums are top draws for history buffs. Highlights of Poland's countryside are the snow-smothered Tatra Mountains and rustic towns of Zakopane and Malbork, all doable on a day-trip from major Polish cities. Hiking opportunities are aplenty, especially in the summer when the lakes in the north are perfect for kayaking and relaxed wanders. Polish pearl and former capital, Krakow, boasts historical gems such as Wawel Castle, Rynek Glowny (Main Market Square), and Kazmierz (Jewish District). If you're short on time, combine a city sightseeing tour with a visit to the nearby Wieliczka Salt Mine, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Also listed is the former German Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum, which allows visitors to reflect on the monumental horrors of the Holocaust during a guided tour. Plus, don't miss out on a visit to the Jasna Gora Monastery in Czestochowa, home to the revered painting of The Black Madonna.

Top 10 attractions in Poland

#1
Gdansk Old Town (Gdańsk Stare Miasto)

Gdansk Old Town (Gdańsk Stare Miasto)

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One of the largest historical centers in Europe, Gdansk Old Town (Gdańsk Stare Miasto) will take you back to the Middle Ages. Due to significant damage during World War II, many buildings are reconstructions of their historic counterparts, but a good number of original structures do remain. Almost one third of the streets in the Old Town have had the same names for more than 500 years.The Old Town doesn’t have a main square; instead, activity centers around the long pedestrian street known as Dlugi Targ, or Long Market. Standing in the middle of Dlugi Targ is the impressive Neptune Fountain, built in 1633. One highlight of any tour around the Old Town include the 14th century Gothic style city hall, which today is home to the Historical Museum of Gdansk. Another must-see is the House of Uphagen, an 18th century town house that offers a glimpse into how the wealthy burghers of that era lived. Also of note are the 12th century Green Gate, the Dlugie Ogrody (Long Gardens), the colorful and cobbled Mariacka Street, St. Mary’s Church and Targ Weglowy (Coal Square).More
#2
Praga

Praga

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Praga is Warsaw’s right-bank area that was once an independent town, from the time of its first mention in 1432. In the late 18th century, it became formally associated with Warsaw as a small settlement.In its early days as a suburb, many buildings were repeatedly destroyed by natural disasters and military battles; the only surviving historical monument from that time is the Church of Our Lady of Loreto.Although it suffered repeated damage in its early days, Praga managed to resist WWII destruction, and today, it’s considered one of Warsaw’s trendiest neighborhoods, oozing a cool bohemian vibe. Post-industrial buildings have been converted into art galleries, cinemas, and pubs. Also look for pre-war elements like sidewalks, apartments and lampposts.Praga is quite a departure from the well-traveled tourist spots in Warsaw proper. Its popularity is on the rise, so now is the best time to visit. Don’t miss historic monuments like Agnieszka Osiecka, ode to the Polish poet and journalist who authored over 2,000 songs; Kapela Podwórkowa, a tribute to pre-war cloth-capped buskers and musicians known as The Courtyard Band; and Monument of Kościuszko Division (Pomnik Kościuszkowców), a tribute to the 1st Tadeusz Kościuszko Infantry Division, who tried to help during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944.More
#3
Warsaw Old Town (Stare Miasto)

Warsaw Old Town (Stare Miasto)

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Almost entirely destroyed during WWII, Warsaw’s historic Warsaw Old Town (Stare Miasto) underwent an extensive restoration that transformed the area into a vibrant riverfront hub. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the neighborhood boasts striking recreations of 17th- and 18th-century structures, as well as the Warsaw History Museum.More
#4
Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum

Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum

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The Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum is the resting place for some 1.5 million people, as the site once served as a concentration camp and extermination site of the European Jewish community during World War II. Today, Auschwitz-Birkenau is an important historical area, allowing visitors to reflect on the monumental horrors that occurred during the genocide.More
#5
St. John's Archcathedral (Archikatedra Sw. Jana)

St. John's Archcathedral (Archikatedra Sw. Jana)

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This stunning Gothic cathedral in the heart of Warsaw's Old Town is one of the most interesting historical landmarks. Built in the 14th century, St John's Cathedral - or Katedra Sw Jana - is one of the oldest churches in all of Poland, but was completely destroyed during World War II during the Polish Uprising. However, like much of the Old Town, it was reconstructed after the war, true to its original architecture.In addition to being the site of many historical events, such as the coronation of the last Polish king, the cathedral also houses the beautiful red marble tombs of many Mazowian dukes, and its crypt is the resting place of many celebrated Poles such as Nobel Prize-winning author Henryk Sienklewicz. The Gothic architecture and artwork is some of the most impressive in Warsaw, and is not to be missed.More
#6
Palace of Culture and Science (Palac Kultury i Nauki)

Palace of Culture and Science (Palac Kultury i Nauki)

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A towering 758 feet (231 meters) high, Warsaw’s Palace of Culture and Science was commissioned by Stalin during Poland’s communist era. Today, the country’s tallest building comprises concert halls, offices, shops, restaurants, and a 30th-floor viewing terrace.More
#7
Wieliczka Salt Mine (Kopalnia Soli)

Wieliczka Salt Mine (Kopalnia Soli)

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An eerie world where everything has been carved from salt blocks, the Wieliczka Salt Mine (Kopalnia Soli) is made up of a labyrinth of tunnels, the deepest of which lies 1,075 feet (327 meters) underground. The ancient UNESCO World Heritage site is a major part of Poland's salt mining history, one of the country's most popular attractions, and one of the world's oldest salt mines, having produced table salt from the 13th century until 2007.More
#8
Zakopane

Zakopane

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Considered Poland’s winter capital, Zakopane is a snow-sports paradise situated at the foot of the Tatras. Attractions include the Gubałówka mountain resort, the nearby thermal springs, and the Wielka Krokiew ski jump. The town is also known for its rich Goral heritage and traditional architecture, as well as sweeping summertime views.More
#9
Krupowki Street (Ulica Krupówki)

Krupowki Street (Ulica Krupówki)

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Krupowki Street (Ulica Krupówki) passes through the heart of Zakopane and ranks among the most famous streets in all of Poland. Stretching for a little over half a mile (1 kilometer), the walking street is lined with restaurants, hotels, bars and boutique shops selling sportswear and luxury fashions. No matter the season, Krupówki Street always bustles with activity; street performers entertain passing tourists while portrait artists draw caricatures. Horse-drawn carriages ferry passengers up and down the promenade.Each summer, the street hosts the International Festival of Highland Folklore, one of Poland’s oldest and largest folk festivals.More
#10
Warsaw Jewish Ghetto (Getto Zydowskie)

Warsaw Jewish Ghetto (Getto Zydowskie)

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The haunting monuments and memorials of Warsaw’s former Jewish Ghetto (Getto Zydowskie) tell the story of its tragic past—during World War II, it was the largest Jewish Ghetto in all of Nazi-occupied Europe.More

Top activities in Poland


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