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Things to do in Chile

Things to do in  Chile

Welcome to Chile

In Chile, coastlines stretch along the Pacific Ocean; the rugged terrain of Patagonia seemingly reaches to the end of the earth; and the dry Atacama desert, Andes mountains, and Valdivian forests nestle against one another to create a country where the topography is as varied as the options for exploring. Santiago de Chile, the country's capital, is a melting pot of Latin culture, bohemian neighborhoods, and colonial architecture. Don't miss out on the views from the top of San Cristobal Hill (Cerro San Cristobal); colorful street art and thumping nightlife in trendy Bellavista; or a bike tour of top city sights. UNESCO World Heritage Site Valparaíso—renowned for its hillside funiculars (cable railways) and street art—as well as beachside gem Viña del Mar are just a 1.5-hour drive away, and easily doable on a day trip from Santiago. If you're seeking outdoor adventure, Patagonia's Torres del Paine National Park boasts surreal beauty, bringing together mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers to make it an ideal location for horseback riding or hiking tours. For wine lovers, Chile is the promised land of New World varietals, with regions such as the Maipo Valley, San Antonio Valley, and the Matetic Vineyards best explored on wine-tasting tours. Further north, the otherworldly landscapes of the Atacama Desert—home to Moon Valley, the Atacama Salt Lake, and the Ojos del Salar—are a must-see from San Pedro de Atacama. Meanwhile, far-flung Rapa Nui Easter Island, home to nearly 900 giant head statues, is a modern mystery best explored on a multi-day trip, including round-trip plane rides.

Top 10 attractions in Chile

#1
Osorno Volcano

Osorno Volcano

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The snow-capped cone of Osorno Volcano is one of Chile’s most recognizable landmarks. Towering over Lake Todos Los Santos and Lake Llanquihue in the Andean mountain range, Osorno is the starting point of Chilean Patagonia and is a magnet for adventurous outdoor enthusiasts who come here to ski, hike, and trek.More
#2
Fort Bulnes (Fuerte Bulnes)

Fort Bulnes (Fuerte Bulnes)

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Visitors to Fort Bulnes, located atop an unforgiving hillside, will surely take note of the unprecedented lengths colonizers went to in order to stake their claim on such inhospitable land.Ancient shipwrecks that line the coastal route between this popular destination and Punta Arenas serve as a reminder of just how treacherous travel could be. While the fort’s museum, which explores the colonization history in Southern Chile and replicas of a historic church, jail, post office and stables are definitely worth the trip, visitors agree that it’s the epic views from scenic trails and the ancient watchtower that prove to be most memorable.More
#3
Ahu Tongariki

Ahu Tongariki

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With 15 gigantic stone-carved moai lined up on a 200-foot-long platform and a remote location framed by the looming Rano Raraku volcano and the crashing ocean, Ahu Tongariki is nothing short of spectacular. For many visitors, this is the star attraction of Easter Island, and looking up at the towering figures, the largest of which stands 14 meters tall, it’s hard not to be in awe of the Rapa Nui people, who achieved the seemingly impossible feat of carving and moving the 30-ton stone boulders to their waterfront perch.Ahu Tongariki is the largest ceremonial site ever made on the island, featuring the largest number of moai ever erected on a single site, and each statue is unique, with only one featuring the iconic red-rock “pukao,” or ceremonial headdress. Even more astounding, considering the size and weight of the statues, is that the site was almost completely destroyed by a tsunami in 1960, with the rocks flung more than 90 meters inland. The ahu has since been painstakingly restored, a project that took Chilean archaeologists Claudio Cristino and Patricia Vargas five years and was finally completed in 1995.More
#4
Anakena Beach

Anakena Beach

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With its stretch of white sand fringed with Tahitian coconut palms, a backdrop of grassy hills and ocean waters that rarely dip below 64 degrees F (18 degrees C) even in the winter months, few places come as close to paradise as Anakena Beach. One of only three beaches on Easter Island, Anakena also plays an important part in the history of the island. It was here that King Ariki Hotu Matu’a first landed on Easter Island and later, the beach became a spiritual center for the Miru tribe–the remnants of which can be seen in the seven beautifully restored moai of Ahu Nau Nau and the single moai of Ahu Ature Huki that overlook the beach.Aside from its striking setting and dramatically situated moai, the main draw to Anakena Beach is, of course, the ocean and the warm, clear waters make the ideal spot for swimming, surfing and snorkeling.More
#5
Valparaíso Historic Quarter

Valparaíso Historic Quarter

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Hailed as the San Francisco of South America, Valparaíso’s Historic Quarter is a UNESCO World Heritage site known for its beautiful buildings, street art, and steep hills. Visit to admire the historic architecture and take a vintage funicular up the summits of the cerros, where you’ll find trendy cafes and bars.More
#6
Milodon Cave (Cueva del Milodon)

Milodon Cave (Cueva del Milodon)

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In 1896, German explorer Eberhard Hermann entered a cave and found strange remains inside, the fur and bones of the extinct Mylodon sloth. Named after the giant ground sloth found within, Milodon Cave (Cueva del Milodon) is the largest of several caves within Cueva del Milodon National Monument. But the sloth wasn’t the only inhabitant of the caves. Remains of other extinct species, including a saber-toothed cat and a dwarf horse, as well as evidence of human habitation from as early as 6,000 BC have been found within the caves.As visitors enter the monument, they’re greeted by a full-size replica of the mylodon sloth, standing 13 feet (4 meters) tall. The mylodon was said to resemble a giant bear, though the mammal was in fact a very large herbivore that went extinct over 10,000 years ago. A viewing point atop the cathedral-sized cave affords visitors views of the surrounding mountains, glaciers and the Eberhard fjord.More
#7
Nao Victoria Museum (Museo Nao Victoria)

Nao Victoria Museum (Museo Nao Victoria)

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Visitors to the Nao Victoria Museum can travel back in time and experience the real-life thrill of a 16th-century sailing experience. Opened in 2011, this destination is celebrated by locals for promoting national identity and preserving much of what makes this area so unique. Visitors can wander through four real-life replicas of famous ships: the Nao Victoria, James Caird, HMS Beagle and Schooner Ancud—boats that played an important role in the discovery of Magallanes. Guides are included in the cost of admission, which makes for rich storytelling while travelers explore the ships.More
#8
El Tatio Geysers

El Tatio Geysers

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Plumes of steam from more than 60 geysers and hundreds of fumaroles erupt several feet into the air at the geyser field of El Tatio, high in the Andes in northern Chile. El Tatio isn’t the largest geyser field in the world, but with a backdrop of snowcapped mountains, it’s perhaps the most picturesque.More
#9
Lauca National Park

Lauca National Park

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Founded in 1970, Lauca National Park in North Chile is part of a UNESCO-designated Global Biosphere Reserve. The park’s breathtaking scenery — snow-capped volcanoes, lakes, lagoons, hot springs and altiplano areas — attract visitors from all corners of the close. Home to more than 140 species of birds, the park is also one of the best in the country for birdwatching, and its biodiversity encompasses the Andean flamingo, giant coot, Puna Ibis and Andean condor, as well as mammals like vicuñas, vizcachas and guanacos.Lake Chungará, one of the planet’s highest lakes and a star feature of Lauca National Park, sitsat the base of the twin Payachata volcanoes, whose snowy peaks reflect off the glassy surface of the water. Trails winding throughout the park cater to visitors of all fitness levels, from the easy one-mile (1.5-kilometer) Las Cuevas interpretive trail to the longer 8-mile (13-kilometer) Cotacotani Trail.More
#10
Llanquihue Lake

Llanquihue Lake

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The town of Puerto Varas sits on the banks of Llanquihue Lake in Chile’s magnificent Lakes District. The lake itself, the second-largest lake in the country after General Carrera Lake, sits at the base of the near-perfect conically shaped Osorno Volcano, adding to its already picturesque qualities.The shores of the 336-square-mile (870-square-kilometer) lake share a German heritage, yet each attracts visitors for a different reason. Puerto Varas is the lake’s adventure capital, while Frutillar on the western banks of the lake appeals to Chilean tourists on summer holiday. The charming Bavarian-style town of Puerto Octay offers remote accommodations on the north shores of the lake, and rustic Ensenada on the eastern banks sits at the entrance to Vicente Perez Rosales National Park.More

Frequently Asked Questions

The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
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