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Things to do in Greece

Things to do in  Greece

Welcome to Greece

Greece never fails to enchant, with its miles of azure coast, well-preserved ancient ruins, and fresh Mediterranean cuisine. The capital of Athens is an ideal starting point—there, guides on walking, bike, Segway, and bus tours lead travelers through the Parthenon, Acropolis, and other buildings of historical and archeological interest, offering insight into both past and present. Combine your tour with a traditional Greek dinner in a classic Plaka taverna, or take a food and wine tour. From Athens, a short day trip north takes visitors to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Delphi, with its Temple of Apollo and other ruins, once central to the ancient world. Experience the clear-blue Aegean Sea on one of the Greek islands, such as Crete, Hydra, or Rhodes. Skip the hassles of arranging transportation, food, and docking points, and book a boat tour to the romantic island of Santorini, famous for its sunsets, wineries, and black-sand beaches. Mykonos, with its contrasting white beaches and legendary party scene, is another unmissable island; hiking, scuba diving, or cruise tours offer a different perspective on its beauty. The more relaxed Syros, which can be part of an island-hopping adventure, is an authentic paradise, where the Greeks themselves go to enjoy the architecture and local restaurants of Ermoupolis. You can book shorter sailboat tours of the Mediterranean from multiple points, and sunset tours are your best bet for postcard-worthy vistas.

Top 10 attractions in Greece

#1
Palace of Knossos

Palace of Knossos

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Once the glorious capital of Minoan Crete and one of the most powerful cities in the eastern Mediterranean, ancient Knossos is a place steeped in legend. Today, it’s Crete’s largest and most important archaeological site, crowned by the hilltop Palace of Knossos—built around 2000 BC—and revealing a fascinating history that stretches all the way back to the earliest European civilizations.More
#2
Santorini Volcano

Santorini Volcano

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The “Santorini volcano” may refer to two different peaks: the first, Thira, exploded around 1600 BC and ended the thriving Minoan civilization and may have spawned the legend of Atlantis. Millennia of eruptions formed the second “Santorini volcano”—the island of Nea Kameni, drawing visitors eager to hike to the rim of its active crater.More
#3
Acropolis

Acropolis

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An archaeological wonder, a UNESCO World Heritage site, and one of the world's most instantly recognizable landmarks, the Acropolis is the star attraction of ancient Athens. Dramatically perched on a jagged clifftop—the so-called sacred rock of Athens—the ruins overlook the modern city and date back to as early as 510 BC.More
#4
Myrtos Beach (Paralía Mirtos)

Myrtos Beach (Paralía Mirtos)

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A regular on lists of the world’s best beaches, Myrtos Beach (Paralía Mirtos) is a 0.5-mile (700-meter) expanse of gleaming white sand curving between two high promontories on Cephalonia’s north coast. While the stunning color comes from rounded pebbles and coarse sand, not fine powder, the view from the blue Ionian Sea is spectacular.More
#5
Navagio Beach (Shipwreck Beach)

Navagio Beach (Shipwreck Beach)

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With white sand and marble cliffs, Navagio Beach (Shipwreck Beach)makes a striking setting for swimming and sunbathing. Set on sun-soaked Zakynthos island off the coast of Greece, Navagio Beach is a popular day trip destination. The beach’s centerpiece is a long-abandoned freighter—the remains of a smuggler’s shipwreck—that still languishes on the sands.More
#6
Blue Caves

Blue Caves

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The bright turquoise waters of the Greek Islands have inspired many a postcard, but perhaps no spot is more idyllic than Blue Caves of Zakynthos. Visit these sea grottoes, carved by thousands of years of erosion, to bask in the glow of the cobalt-blue water that creates a magical reflection on the caves' pale stone walls.More
#7
Old Venetian Harbor

Old Venetian Harbor

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Chania’s spectacular Venetian Harbour is a symbol of the town’s rich and varied history, built between 1320 and 1356 when it was first under control of the Republic of Venice. Made of butter-colored stone and with its walls stretching for just under a mile (1.5 km), it provided sheltered waters and safe anchorage and was originally a thriving trading port with berthing room for up to 40 galleys. A breakwater was constructed to the north of the harbor to protect the ships from storm damage, and on this St Nicholas Chapel and bastion were built. During Venetian times condemned criminals were executed on this spot. The Firkas Fortress (now the Maritime Museum of Crete) at the entrance to the harbor was built with the dual purpose of safeguarding Chania from invasion and housing Venetian troops.However the most striking of the edifices along the Venetian Harbour is the lighthouse (no public access), which dates from around 1570 and looms majestically skywards at the harbor entrance to this day. It is Chania’s most-photographed monument and was restored to its original splendor in the 1840s; the lighthouse is magical when illuminated at night.Today, the Venetian Harbour offers mooring for local fishing boats and pleasure craft; in summer it is a romantic spot to stroll and then enjoy eating and drinking in the many harbor-side restaurants, tavernas and ouzo shops. Even in winter, it’s usually warm enough to sit outside in a café while sipping coffee and enjoying the Cretan sun.More
#8
Hosios Loukas Monastery (Moni Osios Loukas)

Hosios Loukas Monastery (Moni Osios Loukas)

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One of a trio of ancient Greek monasteries listed on the UNESCO World Heritage list, Hosios Loukas Monastery (Moni Osios Loukas) is exquisite example of a Byzantine-era monastery, now preserved as a museum. Founded in the early 10th-century by the hermit monk Luke Stiris, whose tomb is still housed on the premises, the complex comprises two beautifully conserved churches located in a suitably dramatic setting on the tree-lined slopes of Mount Helicon.First up is the Katholikón of Ósios Loukás, the larger of the two churches and renowned for its elaborate 11th-century interiors, a masterpiece of colored marble, vivid frescoes and extraordinary mosaics, including icons by 16th-century painter Michael Damaskinos. The neighboring Chapel of Theotókos is Greece’s only remaining 10th-century church and is most impressive from outside, with its classical Byzantine structure and elaborate brickwork.More
#9
Aristotelous Square

Aristotelous Square

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The hub of civic activity in Thessaloniki is Aristotelous Square, which was designed by French architect Ernest Hébrard in 1918 after the devastating fire of 1917 that destroyed much of the city center. Sitting on the waterfront just off Nikis Avenue, the square was designed to mimic the vast and grandiose open plazas found in many European maritime cities – such as the Praca do Comercio in Lisbon – and to move away from the chaotic layout of Ottoman Thessaloniki towards an ordered town development plan. Today most of the monumental mansions that line the piazza were rebuilt in the 1950s and renovated again in the early 21st century. It is one of the biggest and most impressive squares in Greece, offering a view of Thermaikos Gulf to the southwest and up the grand boulevard of Aristotelous to the gardens of Platia Dikastirion.Thessaloniki is northern Greece’s party town and New Year sees crowds spilling into Aristotelous Square for the countdown to midnight before they pile into late-night clubs and bars to celebrate until sunrise. The square is also a popular spot for social events and festivals throughout the year; during the recent unrest concerning Greece’s financial position within the EU, many protests and political rallies also took place here.More
#10
White Tower (Lefkos Pyrgos)

White Tower (Lefkos Pyrgos)

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The White Tower (Lefkós Pýrgos) is one of the best-loved buildings in Thessaloniki, a dumpy cylinder topped with turrets that sits at the southern end of the seafront promenade of Nikis Avenue. Thought to have been built on the top of Byzantine remains during the reign of Suleiman I the Magnificent in the mid 15th century, the six-story tower is 40 m (131 ft) high and 23 m (75.5 ft) in diameter, with sturdy stone walls dotted with tiny arrow slits. Originally it formed part of the city’s fortifications and was used by Thessaloniki’s Turkish invaders as a place of public execution. Since then the tower served as a communications center in World War I and later as a meteorological laboratory. Three more towers and a defense wall were knocked down after the fire of 1917, and its current use is as a visitor center with an exhibition detailing the turbulent history of the city. A viewing platform at the top of the tower looks out over the sea in one direction and the rooftops of Thessaloniki to the other.One of the most popular evening pastimes for Thessaloniki locals is the waterside stroll up Nikis Avenue, starting at the old port and winding up in front of the White Tower.More

Top activities in Greece

Delphi Day Trip from Athens

Delphi Day Trip from Athens

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1139
From
US$108,56
Athens Full Day Private Tour

Athens Full Day Private Tour

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159
From
US$91,91
Meteora Day Trip by Train from Athens

Meteora Day Trip by Train from Athens

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From
US$114,73
Athens Half-Day Sightseeing Tour

Athens Half-Day Sightseeing Tour

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From
US$80,19
Dinner in the Sky Athens

Dinner in the Sky Athens

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28
From
US$166,54

Frequently Asked Questions