Sydney, Australia
Save to Wishlist

From $217.08 USD

Lowest Price Guarantee

Select Date and Travelers

Number of travelers
Loading available options...

Save to Wishlist

2 hours (Approx.)
Mobile ticket
Offered in: English

Overview

Experience an evening of sublime music that features a performance by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. Go in-depth with an orchestra and dinner package that starts with a guided tour of one of the world’s most iconic performing arts venues: the Sydney Opera House. Walk next door for a delicious two-course meal at Aria Restaurant, head inside the Sydney Opera House to Bennelong Restaurant or Portside Sydney. Top off your evening with a premium seat to hear the music of the Sydney Symphony fill the opera house.
  • Sydney Symphony Orchestra performance at the Sydney Opera House
  • Guided Tour of the Sydney Opera House
  • Two-course dinner at the award wining exclusive Aria Restaurant, Bennelong Restaurant or Portside Sydney
  • Premium and A Reserve seating available
After making your own way to the Sydney Opera House, your symphony evening begins with a fascinating one-hour tour of the celebrated performing arts center.

Follow your expert guide on a walking tour of approximately one hour. Your guide shares fascinating details about the architecture, artists and history of the opera house and gives you access to parts of the building that are normally off-limits. In a venue that hosts more than 1,500 live performances per year, there are sure to be stories around every corner.

After your tour, walk just a few minutes to enjoy a two course pre-theater dinner at Aria Restaurant or step inside the Sydney Opera House and enjoy a two course dinner at Bennelong Restaurant or Portside Sydney (depending on which option you choose). A performance by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra will complete your Red Carpet experience.

At the end of your meal, simply stroll back to the Opera House to watch the Sydney Symphony take the stage. Your dinner and symphony package includes a ticket for the show. The Sydney Symphony is known to select pieces that range from well-loved orchestra classics to innovative contemporary works. This exquisite night with the Sydney Symphony at the Sydney Opera House promises to be one of the highlights of a trip to Australia (details under Itinerary below).

Please note: The Sydney Opera House and Sydney Symphony Dinner Package often sells out weeks in advance. Book now to avoid disappointment.

Refer to the 'View Additional Info' link below for the Sydney Opera House map.

Itinerary

After meeting at the designated point you will be taken on a Sydney Opera House Guided Tour. Afterwards, you will be taken to Aria Restaurant, Bennelong Restaurant or Portside Sydney (depending on the option you choose) for a pre-show dinner. Following dinner, make your way to the Sydney Opera House Concert Hall for the Sydney Symphony performance.


2019 Performance Schedule

A Lunar New Year Celebration 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
The Spring Festival Overture captures the festival excitement of the Lunar New Year. It’s so popular that it was broadcast into space on China’s first lunar probe. It ushers in an East-meets-West musical celebration with dances from the heart of China and thrilling moments from opera by Borodin and Tchaikovsky. And the Jin Wu Koon Lion Dance Troupe ensure the year gets off to an auspicious start. Qigang’s exquisite Iris Unveiled brings shimmering Chinese colours, instruments and voices to the orchestra. The striking, sensuous sound of Peking Opera Singer Meng Meng with erhu (fiddle), pipa (lute) and zheng (zither) contributes to a dreamlike atmosphere, with music that is by turns refined, abandoned and seductive. Directing the celebrations is ‘impeccable and virtuoso’ young conductor Elim Chan. She’s one of Hong Kong’s brightest musical stars.

7:00PM
February 2019: 1, 2

2019 Season Opening Gala 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Humanity’s place in nature is the transcendent theme of Richard Strauss's overpowering Thus Spake Zarathustra. A blazing sunrise begins a hero’s odyssey for ‘joy deeper than a heart’s pain’ in an opulent symphonic poem that takes inspiration from the philosopher Nietzsche and grapples with nothing less than the meaning of life and the nature of the universe. The amazing Diana Doherty reprises her breathtaking performance of Nigel Westlake’s oboe concerto inspired by the Tasmanian wilderness. An evocative tour de force, Spirit of the Wild was composed especially for the ‘dynamic virtuosity’ of our Principal Oboe. Percy Grainger’s warriors storm the hall with unstoppable energy, as bold men and women gather to dance and celebrate. Calling for an immense orchestra, The Warriors is a fierce and exultant Australian classic, brimming with life and colour.

8:00PM
February 2019: 8, 9

Bartok’s Concerto for Orchestra 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Passionate, hypnotic and thrilling: a concert to showcase the collective virtuosity of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. David Robertson begins his final season as Chief Conductor with a concert of music celebrating the power of the orchestra. Taras Bulba is Janáček’s homage to the fearless spirit of Russia, personified by the 16th-century Cossack hero. Depicting three scenes from Nikolai Gogol’s epic novel, Taras Bulba is intense, vast, violent and vividly colourful. Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra is a modern classic – a sensational showcase for a hundred brilliant musicians in full flight, especially in the thrilling whirlwind of a finale. Steve Reich’s iconic minimalist works have influenced classical, electronic and pop music. In the same tradition as Bartók’s concerto, his latest work is for an ensemble of soloists within a larger orchestral background. Reich’s shimmering music pulses with life.

8:00PM
February 2019 : 13, 15, 16

Barry Douglas performs Brahms 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Majestic music to reveal stunning vistas. Pianist Barry Douglas performs heroic Brahms and Sibelius’s Seventh Symphony soars. Called to action by a soaring horn melody, the piano is hero in Brahms’s noble second piano concerto. This concerto is virtually a symphony with piano. Brahms had a gift for creating moments of tranquil intimacy within his most expansive works, and Irish pianist Barry Douglas has been exploring the complete solo piano music of Brahms in a series of acclaimed benchmark recordings: ‘this is indeed Brahms playing of the utmost integrity and authority’ (International Record Review). The remarkable unbroken arc of Sibelius’s Seventh Symphony accelerates across an enigmatic landscape of emotion. Coiled tight within it is all the drama and variety of much bigger works – serene, violent and passionate. It is Sibelius’ final word: a ‘profession of faith’. Aeolian Caprices by Australian composer Richard Mills is an orchestral firework of glittering colour.

8:00PM
March 2019: 29

Simone Lamsma performs Beethoven’s Violin Concerto 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Simone Lamsma ascends the sublime heights of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto and Tchaikovsky wrestles with fate in his Fourth Symphony. Beethoven’s Violin Concerto is the Everest of concertos – the greatest of them all. Sublime and immense, it is some of Beethoven’s most exalted, lyrical and joyous music.
Dutch violinist Simone Lamsma’s performances have been called ‘absolutely stunning’ and ‘piercingly beautiful’ (Chicago Tribune). Now Sydney audiences can discover this major talent. Alexander Shelley is a ‘natural communicator on and off the podium’ and one of the most exciting young conductors of his generation. Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony is obsessed with fate, what the composer called ‘an invincible force that can never be overcome’. This symphony’s turbulent emotions grip the listener by the throat, and at its heart is an outpouring of song, a recollection of lost love that could be a ballet’s soaring pas de deux.

7:00PM
April 2019: 8

8:00PM
April 2019: 3, 5,6

Yulianna Avdeeva performs Chopin’s Piano Concerto No.1 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Discover Yulianna Avdeeva’s dexterity and thrilling assurance in Chopin. Rediscover a Brahms chamber masterwork in a sumptuous orchestral setting. Spell-binding Russian pianist Yulianna Avdeeva finds the tender vulnerability beneath the poised virtuosity of Chopin’s Piano Concerto No.1. The nocturnal core of this concerto is a Romanza of rapt beauty in which Avdeeva’s intimacy with Chopin’s art will be on entrancing display. Avdeeva’s ‘dazzling dexterity and thrilling assurance’ have made her a Chopin interpreter of renown. Sydney critics raved about her 2018 Sydney debut recital: 'Avdeeva is a pianist of mastery and distinctiveness' (SMH). The symphonic ambitions and intricacies of Brahms’s chamber masterpiece are realised in Arnold Schoenberg’s ravishing and revealing orchestration. Schoenberg transcribes the Piano Quartet with genuine love and imagination, capturing the burnished quality of a Brahmsian orchestra with a few modern touches that Brahms might have enjoyed, like the xylophone in the wild, gypsy-inspired finale. Contemporary Polish composer Krzysztof Meyer also pays homage to Brahms, weaving the name and music of this favourite composer into a fascinating sonic tapestry.

8:00PM
May 2019: 15, 17, 18

Dvořák’s Symphony No.6
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Virtuoso showstoppers, Bohemian spirit and Romantic style…
‘For me the violin is the best way I have found to express myself.’ Nemanja Radulović communicates his love of music with every gesture. And he looks and sounds every bit the Romantic virtuoso violinist, cutting a glamorous figure with extravagant mane and high-fashion clothes. The image is backed by serious musical talent and a room-filling sound – as you’ll hear in two love-letters to the violin. Ravel’s Tzigane was inspired by the flamboyant virtuosity of Hungarian fiddling. Radulović plays the part to perfection. The intense song of Chausson’s Poème is tailored to the violin’s expressive gifts. Its moody volatility hints at a stormy drama and great passion. Dvořák’s Sixth Symphony is a joyous romp through Bohemia’s forests and meadows – a pastoral symphony. It glows with contentment in a slow movement that ‘sings of the magic of a summer’s night’ and sparkles with the joy of a popular Czech dance. And the concert begins with superb melodies from Bizet’s music for the play The Girl from Arles.

8:00PM
June 2019: 14

Music of the Oud 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Breaking boundaries. Tawadros and his oud transport us to parts beyond: Egypt and Australia, the past and the future of music. Joseph Tawadros is one of Australian music’s most impressive and charismatic figures: a composer, improviser, storyteller and a brilliant exponent of the oud, the Egyptian lute. Classically trained on this king of Middle Eastern instruments, Tawadros’s virtuoso technique and curiosity have brought him into contact with the worlds of jazz, classical and world traditions to create music that transcends labels and shatters borders.
Classical and original music from the crossroads of East and West, and of old and new, is woven around Tawadros’s Oud Concerto. He shares an almost telepathic rapport with his trio members, brother James, a percussionist, and jazz pianist Matt McMahon, leading to moments of joyous spontaneous invention.

7:00PM
June 2019: 21, 22

Beethoven Symphony No.5 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Vadim Gluzman performs Prokofiev
High spirits and high drama: rollicking Prokofiev from violinist Vadim Gluzman, Beethoven’s always-thrilling Fifth Symphony and fatalistic Verdi. The extrovert virtuosity of Vadim Gluzman and the sound he draws from his legendary Stradivarius is ‘a glory to hear’ (SMH), perfect for the angular lyricism and high energy of Prokofiev’s beguiling Violin Concerto No.2. The concerto comes from the same era as Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet ballet music and has a similar playful and melodious spirit. Designed to dazzle, it shows off a virtuoso violinist’s abilities to thrilling effect.
The shock and awe of Beethoven’s Fifth continues to resonate to this day. The extraordinary Xian Zhang conducts this ultimate symbol of symphonic power with her unique ‘dynamism, agility and precision’.
Fate knocks three times at the beginning of Verdi’s ferocious overture to The Force of Destiny, one of the greatest moments in all opera. Xian Yang is the first woman to hold a titled post with a BBC orchestra and is Music Director of the New Jersey Symphony.

7:00PM
July 2019: 8

8:00PM
July 2019: 3, 5, 6

Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Seductive, sunny and sensational. Mezzo-soprano Susan Graham stars in a concert of French favourites conducted by David Robertson. A star of the operatic stage and the concert hall, Susan Graham is renowned for her interpretation of elegant French songs, which she performs with insight and affection. She’s the ideal exponent of Canteloube’s jewel-like settings of dreamy, funny and sexy folk songs from the Auvergne region. His Songs of the Auvergne include the famous ‘Baïlero’, in which shepherd and shepherdess sing their love across the valleys. The finale of Saint-Saëns’ ‘Organ’ Symphony pulls out all the stops in one of the most exultant of big tunes for full orchestra and the Concert Hall’s Grand Organ. But there are many other delightful moments in Saint-Saëns’ perfectly constructed magnum opus: rippling pianos, sparkling woodwinds and voluptuous strings. Chabrier’s España is an irresistible sun-drenched visit to Spain – an image of guitars and flamenco sketched in the brightest colours.

8:00PM
July 2019: 19

Britten’s Peter Grimes in Concert 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
David Robertson conducts a superb cast led by Stuart Skelton in Peter Grimes, one of the great operas of the 20th century. Peter Grimes is a psychologically penetrating portrait of a tortured outsider antihero versus the cruelty of a small-town mob. Set in The Borough, a claustrophobic Suffolk fishing village, this tragic drama plays out against vivid musical seascapes. Nature is a character – beautiful, tender and savage. Grimes – wild, individual and visionary – hurls himself against the implacable forces of society and the sea. David Robertson’s ‘driven, exacting’ conducting and a cast led by an extraordinary Grimes in Australian tenor Stuart Skelton bring this gripping and resonant opera to life in the concert hall, backed by the power of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

7:00PM
July 2019: 25, 27

Shostakovich Symphony No.4
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
James Ehnes plays Khachaturian
Khachaturian’s violin concerto overflows with exotic melody and Mark Wigglesworth conducts Shostakovich’s electrifying Fourth Symphony. The arabesques and infectious energy of Armenian folk music animate Aram Khachaturian’s extravagantly tuneful Violin Concerto, the ideal vehicle for James Ehnes’s suave and soulful playing.
Ehnes is a captivating performer with the bearing of a matinee-idol and a voluptuous sound, who ‘ennobles virtually every piece of music he performs’ (Limelight). Shostakovich’s huge Fourth Symphony is a churning dynamo of sound for a huge orchestra. Visceral, grandiose, cartoonish and tragic, it is one of Shostakovich’s most pointed works: a jab at the pompous tyrants, and a cry of anguish. After its premiere was cancelled, Shostakovich turned to more covert means of dissent; his life depended on it.Shostakovich expert Mark Wigglesworth has the measure of this enigmatic masterpiece that retains an electrifying power and relevance to this day.

8:00PM
August 2019: 28, 30, 31

Schubert, Liszt and Ledger 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Simone Young’s Visions of Vienna
Simone Young shows us visions of Vienna and then takes us to hell and back with Liszt’s epic Dante Symphony.
In his Two Memorials Australian composer James Ledger remembers the ‘difficult’ Viennese composer Anton Webern and icon John Lennon. It’s a surprising musical juxtaposition as 60s pop psychedelia meets serialism, but there is a fateful connection between the two composers. Liszt wraps orchestral finery around one of Schubert’s great solo piano masterpieces, the Wanderer Fantasy, to create a kind of concerto. It’s a poetic vehicle for Louis Lortie’s dazzling insightful and pianism, conducted by Simone Young in a program that showcases her affinity for richly expressive music. Liszt was inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy, writing vividly infernal, voluptuous and heavenly music to take us through Hell and Purgatory and on to a celestial song of faith. Liszt was an ambitious and innovative musician, creating a radically new sound for the piano and ‘inventing’ the symphonic poem – using the orchestra to brilliantly evoke mood, colour, people and places

8:00PM
August 2019: 23

Holst's Planets 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
The Planets is a must-hear event with Ashkenazy as your guide to the heavens, and virtuoso Alexei Volodin seduces with the Medtner’s piano concerto. Russia comes to London with a concerto by Nikolai Medtner, the Russian virtuoso who settled there in the 1930s. Medtner’s music has long been overshadowed by that of his friend Rachmaninoff, but his first concerto revels in the sheer beauty of the piano, spinning fabulous melodies that seem to flow from the soul of the instrument. And Alexei Volodin makes a seductive case for this opulent work. He’s a pianist in the muscular Russian tradition with the soul of a poet, displaying ‘magisterial mental and physical control that serve musical imagination and insight’. The Planets is a must-hear event under Vladimir Ashkenazy’s baton. The astrological portraits of the celestial bodies are triumphs of dazzling orchestral magic and unforgettable musical imagery – the foreboding march of Mars, the fizzing energy of Mercury, the ethereal voices of Neptune. And the big, uplifting tune for Jupiter was such a hit that it was adapted as the song ‘I Vow to Thee My Country’

8:00PM
September 2019: 25, 27, 28

The Four Seasons
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
There’ll be eight seasons in one day when Vivaldi’s famous Four meet the tango rhythms of Piazzolla’s year in Buenos Aires. Concertmaster Andrew Haveron is virtuoso soloist in Vivaldi’s dazzlingly imaginative evocation of the sights, sounds and sensations of the Italian seasons. The Four Seasons violin concertos are so richly detailed you can feel the sirocco of summer, hear the dancing villagers of Autumn and slip on the ice of a Venetian winter. The master of the New Tango, Ástor Piazzolla, brought the wild dance of Buenos Aires into the concert hall. There’s an apt nod to Vivaldi in Leonid Desyatnikov’s sensational string arrangements of the Estaciones Porteñas, but they have an atmosphere that’s unique to Buenos Aires – fiercely sensual in summer, hazy and melancholic in winter, all moving to the heartbeat of the tango. Vivaldi’s seasons enfold Piazzolla’s in this dance around the year.

7:00PM
October 2019: 11, 12


Donald Runnicles conducts Bruckner Symphony No.7 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
You don’t listen to a Bruckner symphony, you inhabit it. Donald Runnicles is our guide in Bruckner’s expansive – yet accessible – Seventh. Intoxicating, enveloping and vast, Anton Bruckner’s symphonies are cathedrals of sound. Within these spaces, shadows and shafts of glorious light play and Bruckner’s Seventh is the perfect introduction. It has the time-stopping beauty that defines his music – the long, arching melodies and triumphant climaxes – in a more accessible package. Donald Runnicles is one of the great Bruckner conductors and a passionate advocate for this rewarding music. Messiaen’s ardent and ecstatic ‘Forgotten Offerings’ is his orchestral opus one – and, like Bruckner’s music, it points to the infinite in freely floating, iridescent curls of sound.

8:00PM
October 2019: 18

Donald Runnicles conducts Fauré’s Requiem
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
A journey through life, death and the beyond, with music by Richard Strauss and Fauré’s radiantly beautiful Requiem.
Richard Strauss harnesses music’s ability to express the inexpressible in Death and Transfiguration, a moving journey into a blazing eternity. And Strauss recalls this youthful work in the serene farewell of Four Last Songs. Strauss’s late masterpiece is sensuously in touch with the joys of life, even as life slips away.
Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem for soprano, baritone, choir and orchestra remembers the dead and consoles the living with music of poignant elegance and heavenly beauty. It is one of the most beloved sacred works in the repertoire – timeless, contemplative and radiant.

8:00PM
October 2019: 18, 23, 25, 26

A Russian Gala 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
The compelling artistry of Behzod Abduraimov in Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No.1, and Rachmaninoff’s most popular symphony. Since Behzod Abduraimov’s Australian debut in 2012, he has transitioned from prodigy to career musician, becoming ‘the most perfectly accomplished pianist of his generation’ (The Independent) and earning him comparisons with towering figures like Horowitz, Cliburn and Ashkenazy. This exciting virtuoso brings his amalgam of ‘fire and poetry’ to Tchaikovsky’s piano concerto – the ultimate Romantic masterpiece – a work he attacks ‘with aplomb and plays with grandeur and depth’ (The Times). Discover it afresh in Abduraimov’s hands. Sweeping us from despair to joy, Rachmaninoff’s turbulent Symphony No.2 presents his eloquent melodies in full force. The young Lionel Bringuier possesses a ‘natural authority allied to deep musical understanding’, and he is attuned to the emotional twists and turns of Rachmaninoff’s mercurial personality.

8:00PM
November 2019: 8, 9

American Harmonies
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
From the crashing chords of the beginning to the glittering ecstasy of its finale, John Adams’ Harmonielehre has the unstoppable energy of a rocket – or of the levitating oil tanker that Adams saw in the dream that inspired the piece.
Meshing churning minimalism with achingly lyrical melodies, Adams creates a powerful new kind of Romanticism. As the name suggests, it is a surprising lesson in the power of harmony. This exhilarating symphonic dynamo seduces and astounds three decades on. Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring uses wide-open harmonies and folk-like themes to evoke rural America: dignified and spare. This impressionistic music of heart-swelling nobility and vitality is the sound of America. Christopher Rouse’s forceful gestures and searing colours meet the bassoon’s idiosyncratic persona in his new concerto. Co-commissioned by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.
8:00PM
November 2019: 29

Mahler's Klagende Lied 
Performed in the Concert Hall
Duration: TBC
Simone Young’s Visions of Vienna
Simone Young and company close the 2019 season in legendary style.The charismatic Simone Young is one of Australia’s finest musical exports, at home in opera theatres and concert halls. Her gift for shaping musical narratives and mustering huge forces are valuable assets in Gustav Mahler’s dark and theatrical fairy tale. Enchanted horns usher into dark forests where two brothers vie for the queen’s hand, with dire consequences… Inspired by stories from the Brothers Grimm, Das klagende Lied (The Sorrowful Song) calls for singers, choir and two orchestras (one of them off-stage). It is Mahler’s astonishingly assured opus one, a preview of his epic, kaleidoscopic symphonies. Like those, it bursts with the magic and mystery of nature, and the joys and fears of childhood.

8:00PM
December 2019: 4, 6, 7

Reviews

Viator Traveler's Reviews

4.5
22 Reviews
5 Star
4 Star
3 Star
2 Star
1 Star
C
, Apr 2018

Worth every cent. We enjoyed learning about the construction history and the politics behind it.

n
, Feb 2018

Unbelievable tour. Completely worth it. The tour was informative and fun. Dinner at Bennelong was SUPERB!!! And being in the
Sydney Opera House watching the Australian Symphony perform was something I'll never forget. Book this tour!

b
, Nov 2017

terrific behind the scenes tour. visit the stages of many studios hidden within complex. tour guide excellent. Dinner 4 star at Aria.
Concert and acoustics wonderful. Opera house and surrounding harbor views outstanding.

h
, Nov 2017

The concert was good, but promoted as Belshazzar's Feast which was 30 mins in length but really excellent. The first part of the programme was 50 mins long and by an unknown composer.
The tour was useless as we were not told that the opera hall was being refurbished and we were shown two other halls one of which we had been to for the concert.
The meal at the restaurant was really minimal. Wine was twice or three times the price at other opera house venues. It really felt like a rip-off.
We cannot recommend this tour to anyone right now. Only the Belshazzar's Feast made us pleased we went.

J
, Nov 2017

I heard a wonderful concert in this amazing venue. The tour of the SOH was amazing. I got to go behind the scenes to view the inner working of the House. My tour guide explained the history of the building, the architect and all the struggles involved with actually building it, why there are so many sails and the inner beauty of this venue. I then had dinner at The Bennelong Restaurant! This was amazing. I was seated by the window so I was able to watch the sun set behind the Sydney Harbor Bridge. The photo ops were great. The food was spectacular. I ate for the variety of the locale, including the wine I splurged on. This was a fantastic package. I'd encourage anyone who wants to delve in the Sydney Opera House to experience this tour.

A
, Aug 2017

What can I say. Tour was very interesting - guide was excellant. Dinner as Aria Restaurant was divine. Orchestra was excellant .

P
, Nov 2015

The tour guide was extremely informative and interesting. We chose the dinner package , the Aria Restaurant is wonderful and the food delicious. The concert was brilliant. Highly recommend this tour package .

J
, Aug 2015

We thoroughly enjoyed our trip. The Opera House tour was brilliant - our guide was clearly besotted with the place and passed his enthusiasm onto us. Our meal was very nice - quite small and ridiculously overpriced - must admit that I would never pay as much for any meal as a rule and as usual, the more you pay, the less you get ! - and the concert was very good. That it was in the Concert Hall was excellent as we thought that was a wonderful room.

J
, Jul 2015

The guide was completely knowledgable and the back stage and inside your was absolutely wonderful. It was with a small group and felt private and personal.
Afterward the Aria Restaraunt was a fabulous way to begin a charming night of enjoying the arts as the symphony that followed was perfect!

P
, May 2015

The concert was great, as well as the tour and dinner.


Having trouble booking online?
(888) 651-9785
Call (888) 651-9785
Product code: 2482SOH6

Explore Similar Things to Do